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Events focus on Asian-Pacific culture

RICHLAND – Asian-Pacific Heritage will be celebrated with a lecture and a movie April 17 at WSU Tri-Cities.

“Interdependent Construal of Self and the Asian American Experience” is the topic of a 1 p.m. lecture by Associate Professor Stephanie San Miguel Bauman with the WSU Tri-Cities College of Education. Her talk in the West Building Atrium is followed by a lunch buffet.

The movie, “Wedding Banquet,” by director Ang Lee (of “Brokeback Mountain” fame) will be shown at 7 p.m. in the East Building Auditorium.

The April 17 events are sponsored by the Multicultural Club and are held on the WSU Tri-Cities campus, 2710 University Drive, Richland. Admission to each is free and open to the public.
 
While May is Asian-Pacific Heritage Month, spring semester ends May 2 — so the events are being held in advance to ensure WSU Tri-Cities students have the opportunity to participate.

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