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First influenza of season diagnosed

PULLMAN – Influenza has arrived again at WSU. A patient at Health and Wellness Services today tested positive for influenza A, cconfirmed case in the clinic for the current flu season.

“There is a misperception that if you haven’t gotten sick by now, then you’re safe from the flu,” said Marsha Turnbull, health education administrator at HWS. “In reality it isn’t uncommon to see flu season in Pullman begin in January and continue through spring.”

It’s not too late to get vaccinated. While it does take a couple weeks for the vaccine to be effective, it is still a good idea to add that protection for the rest of flu season. Students can stop by the clinic located on the first floor of the Washington Building any morning during office hours to get a flu shot for $25. Even with vaccination, it is important for everyone to practice respiratory etiquette such as frequent hand washing for at least 20 seconds, covering coughs and staying away from people who are ill.

Symptoms such as fever, headache, tiredness, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose and body aches are common flu symptoms. These can often be confused with other viral and bacterial infections, but anyone with these symptoms should seek medical attention. HWS offers urgent care during regular office hours, including Saturdays and most holidays. Students also may call 509-335-3575 and press 6 to speak with a 24-hour telephone nurse.

For more information about the flu or medical services, visit www.hws.wsu.edu or call 509-335-3575.

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