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33 dead at Virginia Tech; WSU offers counseling

A lone gunman went on a shooting rampage Monday morning, April 16, at Virginia Tech univerversity, murdering at least 32 people, injuring about 29 others, then committing suicide, making it the deadliest school shooting in U.S. history. 

Identification of some of the vicitims are starting to be released and are being posted online on some major media websites, like CNN and some of those below.

The gunman, has been identified as Seung-hui Cho, 23, a registered alien of Korean nationality and a senior English student at Virginia Tech.

According to the Associated Press, the English department’s director of creative writing, Lucinda Roy, described Cho as “troubled.” The English department chairwoman, Carolyn Rude, told the AP that Cho had been referred to the university’s counseling service. Others have described him as a “loner.”

Some news reports, including CBS News and AP, say Cho may have been taking medication for depression, that he was becoming increasingly violent and erratic, and that he left a note in his dorm in which he railed against “rich kids,” “debauchery” and “deceitful charlatans” on campus.

Using two semi-automatic handguns, Cho murdered two students at West Ambler Johnston dormitory. About two hours later, he appeared on the opposite side of the Blacksburg, Va., campus in Norris Hall, where he murdered 30 more people and injured about 22 others.

One group of students heard shots and screams and took action, barricading the door with a table. The gunman tried to get in and even shot at the door. Their actions saved all their lives. See video interview with student Zach Petkewicz by going to www.CNN.com then clicking on the video titled “student barricaded door.” 
 
Area hospitals reported treating 22 injured in the attacks. Scott Hill of Montgomery Regional Hospital said Tuesday morning that 12 are still hospitalized, and that overnight three of those in critical condition were upgraded to stable, according to a National Public Radio report.

In the aftermath of this tragedy, WSU Counseling Services encourages WSU employees and students who want to talk to a counselor to contact them at 335-4511 or visit the office in Lighty 280.

Washington State University President V. Lane Rawlins also issued a message on April 17 to faculty, staff and students regarding the tragedy, and precautions in place on the WSU campuses, see http://www.wsu.edu/president/updates/41.html

The Virginia Tech website can be viewed at www.vt.edu. For additional news, go to any of the following news websites.

Regional Media:

* FOX 12 — Takes Look At WSU Security, http://www.kptv.com/news/12264063/detail.html

* Seattle P-I — “Security review at campuses in Seattle can’t eliminate all risk,” http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/311826_localangles17.html

* Seattle Times — “Local universities increase security patrols as reassurance,” http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/texis.cgi/web/vortex/display?slug=vatechsecurity17m&date=20070417&query=wsu

* KREM-TV — “Armed teachers in the classroom?,” http://www.krem.com/news/local/stories/krem2_041707_campussecurity.17f55b5c.html

National Media:
* CNN — http://www.cnn.com/
* CBS News — http://www.cbsnews.com/
* National Public Radio — http://www.npr.org/
* ABC News — http://www.abcnews.com
* Chicago Tribune — http://www.chicagotribune.com
* Yahoo News — http://news.yahoo.com
* Google News — http://news.google.com

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