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Vet students raise funds for pediatric patients

His name is “Josh” and he’s here to encourage children who are about to make that scary journey through surgery. The smiling, stuffed golden retriever is part of the “Josh and Friends Project” being developed by students in the WSU Student Chapter of the American Veterinary Medical Association (SCAVMA).

The program — sponsored in partnership with the Children’s Miracle Network alliance of children’s hospitals — is designed to help pediatric patients cope with hospitalization and medical procedures. Veterinary students across the nation are joining the project and donating kits that include Josh and a book, “I’ll Be OK,” written by veterinarian Randall Lange.

“We are hoping to raise funds to provide the Josh books and animals to as many local children as possible,” said Christine Towey, SCAVMA senior community service chair. Each kit costs $40 and all proceeds go toward purchasing more kits for the children.

 “This also will be an opportunity for students to develop professional skills such as communication and client interaction,” Towey said.

If you would like to help support the Josh and Friends Project, donations can be made to: SCAVMA, c/o Christine Towey, Office of Student Services, College of Veterinary Medicine, P.O. Box 647012, Pullman, WA 99164-7012. Towey’s e-mail is toweyc@vetmed.wsu.edu.

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