Bird owners get anti-flu advice

Hundreds of undocumented chickens live in Seattle, a clucking time bomb planted right in the urban core that poses just as great a risk for deadly bird flu as any rural chicken should the severe Asian strain of avian influenza ever finds its way to this region.

All bird owners need to educate themselves how best to protect themselves and their animals. Basically, it involves specific hygiene practices, restricting access to the birds and aggressive reporting of ill birds to officials.

“Biosecurity is the best method of controlling these diseases,” said Dr. A. Singh Dhillon, director of the avian health laboratory at the Puyallup branch of Washington State University.

For the full article, click on the following link to the Seattle Post-Intelligencer at http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/287481_birdflu04.html

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