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News and Information for Faculty, Staff, and the WSU Community

Women’s Transit picks up three new cars

Women’s Transit volunteer drivers and passengers are safer this school year, thanks to three new cars.

The cars, 2004 Ford Tauruses, came through a collaboration of support from Facilities Operations, Business Affairs, Student Affairs, ASWSU and GPSA, to name a few. The vehicles replace 8-year-old models that were suffering from unreliable brakes and seat belts, among other wear.

Last year, Women’s Transit safely delivered more than 26,000 riders with the help of 290 volunteers.

Transit begins operations on Sept. 19. For those interested in volunteering, applications may be picked up at the Women’s Resource Center on the bottom floor of Wilson.

“This is primarily a student program, but faculty and staff can be very helpful,” said Alice Coil, director of the WRC, “especially during busy weekends like Dad’s Weekend!”

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Forest debris could shelter huckleberry from climate change

WSU scientists are at work in Northwest forests, studying how fallen logs and other woodland debris could shelter the huckleberry from a hotter, drier future.

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Forest debris could shelter huckleberry from climate change

WSU scientists are at work in Northwest forests, studying how fallen logs and other woodland debris could shelter the huckleberry from a hotter, drier future.

WSU helps dog recover from lung condition

It is still a mystery as to what caused abscesses to engulf the lungs of Ashley Hayes’ dog, Blaze, but he is now back in good health thanks to the care he received at WSU.

WSU ‘Q fever’ research earns $3 million in funding

Q fever naturally infects goats, sheep, and cattle. If transmitted to humans, the infection can lead to diverse clinical outcomes including flu-like symptoms, miscarriage or stillbirth in pregnant women.

UREC training helps Cougs rescue injured Grand Canyon hiker

The hiker looked like she might be taking a break from the strenuous ascent from the bottom of the Grand Canyon, but it was clear she was in trouble when WSU students Alana Duvall and Johannah Ludwig reached her.

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