WSU Cougar Head Logo Washington State University
WSU Insider
News and Information for Faculty, Staff, and the WSU Community

Feds pick vet lab as test site

Washington State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine is one of seven laboratories nationwide recently chosen to conduct tests for mad cow disease for the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The USDA has allocated $70 million for the nationwide program, which is expected to last 12-18 months.

WSU plans to test about 5,200 cattle from Washington over the next year and likely will hire two additional employees, said Charlie Powell, communication coordinator for the college. The lab may also get approval to test cattle samples from other states, he said.

The first U.S. case of mad cow disease was discovered in Mabton, Wash., in December. Since then, more than 25 countries have banned U.S. beef. This new USDA initiative hopes to convince those countries to reopen their markets.

Other approved state laboratories are located in California, Colorado, Texas, Wisconsin, Georgia and New York, and include facilities at Cornell, Texas A&M and the University of California-Davis.

Next Story

Bee center filling up, honey extractor moves in

Honey will soon be made at WSU’s Honey Bee & Pollinator Research, Extension, and Education Facility in Othello after a large equipment move.

Recent News

Bee center filling up, honey extractor moves in

Honey will soon be made at WSU’s Honey Bee & Pollinator Research, Extension, and Education Facility in Othello after a large equipment move.

Tribal connection inspires efforts to save salmon

Studying toxic runoff to help save iconic salmon species, Stephanie Blair draws on science as well as the knowledge and connections of her Native American community.

Insider will return Nov. 29

WSU Insider is taking a break to join with the rest of the university community in celebrating the Thanksgiving holiday. We’ll be back the morning of Nov. 29 with fresh posts for the WSU community.

Scouting for a forgotten few

WSU historian Ryan Booth sheds light on the largely forgotten history of the Northern Cheyenne and White Mountain Apache who served as scouts for the U.S. Army from 1866–1947.

Find More News

Subscribe for more updates