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WSU News Emerging Diseases

Africa honors young scientist for infectious disease work

PULLMAN, Wash. – The African Academy of Sciences (AAS) this week recognized Washington State University’s Thumbi Mwangi as one of 22 early career scientists selected to be affiliates through 2021. » More …

Ask Dr. Universe: How do vaccines work?

dr-universe-logoPULLMAN, Wash. – The quick, little sting of a vaccine shot can provide us with some big protection from germs that cause disease. » More …

Researcher finds possible link between cattle, human disease

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University professor William C. Davis and colleagues published a case report last month that provides more evidence that two gastrointestinal diseases, one in cattle the other in people, may be linked. » More …

Veterinary professor named to international scientific panel

don-knowlesPULLMAN, Wash. – Don Knowles, a U.S. Department of Agriculture research veterinary medical officer and professor in Washington State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine, is one of 16 people named to an international scientific advisory panel. » More …

Board of Global Animal Health-Tanzania to meet in Pullman

PULLMAN, Wash. – The Board of Directors of Global Animal Health – Tanzania (GAH-T), a non-profit corporation affiliated with Washington State University, will hold its annual meeting on Wednesday, September 21, at 3:00 pm. The meeting will be held in Room 201 of the Paul G. Allen Center for Global Animal Health at Washington State University in Pullman. » More …

Software improves ability to catalog bacterial pathogens

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have developed a new software tool that will improve scientists’ ability to identify and understand bacterial strains and accelerate vaccine development. » More …

New chief of Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health

By Laura Lockard, College of Veterinary Medicine

Tom-KawulaPULLMAN, Wash. – Professor Tom Kawula will be the new director of the Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health at Washington State University beginning Oct. 1. » More …

Research finds some gut bacteria resist malaria parasite

By Charlie Powell, College of Veterinary Medicine

Nicolas-VillarinoPULLMAN, Wash. – Microorganisms living in a person’s gut play a key role in how that individual may be affected by the malaria parasite, according to studies led by a Washington State University researcher. » More …