Daryll DeWald, chancellor of WSU Health Sciences, took on the added title of vice president of health sciences, effective Monday, July 1.

The new position reflects DeWald’s additional responsibilities overseeing WSU’s Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine, College of Nursing, and College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, all of which are based in Spokane, but have statewide presence. Additionally, deans of the three Spokane-based colleges will report to DeWald. Previously all deans reported to the university provost in Pullman.

“Daryll DeWald has been an effective, dynamic leader for WSU’s health sciences programs,” said Kirk Schulz, president of the university. “Medicine, nursing and pharmacy are critical to WSU’s mission to serve the people of Washington and to its goal of becoming a top 25 public research university. Daryll’s background, his talents and his drive will help get us there.”

DeWald was named chancellor of WSU Health Sciences in September 2017. In his two years as chancellor, he has amplified the statewide responsibility and reach of WSU health education and research, with significant activities underway in Everett, Pullman, Tri‑Cities, Walla Walla, Vancouver and Yakima. This evolution of health sciences education, research and health care delivery ultimately supports WSU’s overall land‑grant mission.

“This appointment is a reflection of the growing importance of WSU Health Sciences,” DeWald said. “With more than 1,600 students, 940 faculty and staff, and $32.5 million in external funding research, the campus is well on its way to becoming an economic engine for the region.”

He added, “We’ve got strong momentum behind WSU Health Sciences. Thanks to the work of our region’s delegation in Olympia, the state is upping its support of the College of Medicine, allowing it to educate even more doctors from Washington, for Washington. And our longtime nursing and pharmacy programs continue to innovate their curricula to adapt to the changing health care environment.”

DeWald also spearheaded the creation of the Steve Gleason Institute for Neuroscience, bringing together academic and medical researchers, clinics, patients and community organizations to target neurodegenerative diseases. Improving the on‑campus climate for students in Spokane has also been a focus.

Among DeWald’s first tasks as vice president of health sciences will be naming new deans to lead the colleges of nursing and pharmacy. Nationwide searches are underway for those positions.

DeWald was a life-sciences researcher and professor before joining WSU in 2011 as dean of the former College of Sciences. He led the merger that resulted in the College of Arts and Sciences and became dean of the merged college, the university’s largest academic unit.

Media contact:

  • Kim Papich, director of communications and public affairs, WSU Health Sciences Spokane, 509‑368‑6671 or 509‑202‑3955, or kim.papich@wsu.edu.