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Pharmacy Ph.D. student wins Three Minute Thesis contest

By C. Brandon Chapman, College of Education

PULLMAN, Wash. – Panshak Dakup, a College of Pharmacy doctoral student at Washington State University Spokane, won the annual Three Minute Thesis (3MT) event in Pullman Tuesday with his presentation, “The Benefits of Circadian Function in Cancer Therapy.”

“Mr. Dakup was really relatable, funny and, above all, helped the audience understand why his research was relevant,” said judge Rudy Trejo, associate director for WSU Student Involvement. Read a recent article about research in which Dakup participates at https://news.wsu.edu/2016/06/06/benefits-timing-chemotherapy-bodys-awake-time/.

For the event, competitors present their research in no more than three minutes. Judges rate performances on ability to connect with the audience and present technical details so non-specialized audiences can understand. Learn more at http://3mt.wsu.edu/.

Following college and campus contests, eight finalists squared off Tuesday at WSU Pullman in the 3MT competition, administered by the College of Education. Dakup won with a presentation one judge deemed “well presented and with great delivery.”

Winners receive travel grants sponsored by the Office of the Provost. Dakup’s award is $3,000. Second place, won by Julie Noyes from the College of Education, is $1,500. Third place, won by Zachary Cartwright from CAHNRS, is $500.

 

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