By Christina VerHeul, Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine

elson floyd college of medicine research 2017SPOKANE, Wash. – Fewer than three years since its inception, Washington State University’s Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine is making its mark on university research by securing $10 million in new grants and contract awards this fiscal year.

Just six months into the college’s 2018 fiscal year (which began July 1), the sum is $2.7 million higher than new grants and contracts awarded in the entire 2017 fiscal year, and $3.9 million higher than those awarded in the 2016 fiscal year.

The grants will be used to explore a wide range of health science issues that align with the college’s vision of solving problems in challenging healthcare environments. Some of the largest awards went to studies focusing on immune response, treating alcohol disorders in the mentally ill, autism and sleep disturbances, addiction, the underlying mechanisms of sleep, and lifestyle and health variances in twins. A total of 21 new projects received funding.

$10 million in grants will help further medical research and community medical training at WSU Spokane.
$10 million in grants will help further medical research and community medical training at WSU Spokane.

“This has been a successful year for our researchers, and receiving these funds further validates the quality of research we are conducting,” said John Roll, professor and vice dean for research at Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine and associate vice president for health sciences research at WSU. “Research is a major focus of both the college of medicine and WSU, so we are proud to contribute significantly to this effort in such a short period of time.”

Research grants also signal a boost for the local economy. In addition to creating job opportunities for researchers and supporting roles, expanding research increases the Spokane area’s portfolio of health sciences expertise and aids in business interest from health science companies.

The Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine is a community-based medical school, named after WSU’s late president Elson S. Floyd. It was created to expand medical education and health care access in communities across the state. Accredited in October 2016, the college welcomed its inaugural class in August 2017.

 

Media Contact:

Christina VerHeul, director of communications and marketing, Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine, 509-368-6850, christina.verheul@wsu.edu