PULLMAN, Wash. – The African Academy of Sciences (AAS) this week recognized Washington State University’s Thumbi Mwangi as one of 22 early career scientists selected to be affiliates through 2021.

A clinical assistant professor in the Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health, Mwangi coordinates research and educational activities of the school’s East Africa program. Learn more about him at http://globalhealth.wsu.edu/Our-Team/faculty/samuel-thumbi-mwangi.

“Dr. Mwangi has had a major impact in infectious disease research and in ensuring that research is translated into policy,” said Guy Palmer, senior director of global health in the Allen School. “He has played a key role in extending WSU’s global impact through developing truly collaborative partnerships with the Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI) and the University of Nairobi. These partnerships are required for health impact and reflect WSU’s global commitment.”

Because Africa loses an average of about 20,000 professionals a year to countries outside the continent due to lack of infrastructure and opportunities, AAS provides affiliates with mentoring from senior scientists. It promotes opportunities for the young scholars to attend conferences, workshops and other activities to improve their skills in research proposal development and grant writing so they can win funding, improve their publication records and ensure that their research impacts their communities.

Learn more about the new affiliates at http://aasciences.ac.ke/updates/news/aas-affiliates-20172021/. Learn more about the AAS at http://aasciences.ac.ke/about/about-us/about-the-aas/.