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Rock Doc column: Fighting a sly, crippling disease
November 5, 2013

E. Kirsten Peters, College of Agricultural, Human and Natural Resource Sciences

Peters-e-k-2010-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Normally, when a bacterium invades your body, it is surrounded and engulfed by a white blood cell. At least that’s what we were taught in high school biology. If all goes well, the white blood cell kills the bacterium and the infection is over: case closed.

New insights into role of belief in learning
October 31, 2013

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By J. Adriana Aumen, College of Arts and Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – With support from a $1.6 million grant, a new faculty member is studying people’s beliefs about whether intelligence can be increased and how this shapes attitudes, behaviors and expectations.

Partnership boosts east Africa, WSU ed, research opportunities
October 29, 2013

PULLMAN, Wash. – “A center for all of east Africa,” is how Jerman Rose describes the Nelson Mandela African Institute of Science and Technology (NM-AIST) in Arusha, Tanzania. It is central for expanding research and education in Africa as well as attracting Washington State University students to study and learn.

Rock Doc column: In the science of detecting bluffs, ‘poker faces’ don’t tell all
October 21, 2013

By E. Kirsten Peters, College of Agricultural, Human and Natural Resource Sciences 

Peters-e-k-2010-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Experienced poker players know the basic odds of drawing the card they need to build a better hand. They also are good at estimating if their hand is likely to be better than those of the other players around the table. In other words, probability and statistics are built into the game of poker.

Vancouver professor receives $1.1 million in grants to study how the brain understands what it hears
October 17, 2013

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By Brenda Alling, WSU Vancouver

VANCOUVER, Wash. – Christine Portfors, associate professor of biology and neuroscience and head of the Hearing and Communication Laboratory at Washington State University Vancouver, has received two federal grants totaling more than $1.1 million over three years. The grants will be used to study how neurons in the brains of mice detect, discriminate and categorize the different types of sounds mice use to communicate.