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Health insurance hikes hit paychecks Jan. 1
November 1, 2002

Brace yourself and your personal budget. Major increases in your medical and dental insurance premiums will take effect in exactly 60 days, which means your net take-home pay will shrink beginning Jan. 10. Why? There are two reasons. First, due to a downturn in the economy, the state is facing a $2 billion economic deficit and has to make cuts to balance the budget. Second, medical/dental costs nationally have “skyrocketed,” according to Washington’s Health Care Authority, with increases up to 30 percent in some states. The brunt of that increase is said to be due to increased use and cost of pharmaceuticals. HCA has reported … » More …

Activist talks health care
October 18, 2002

Dr. Sidney Wolfe, co-founder and director of the Washington, D.C.-based Public Citizen Health Research Group and former adviser to Ralph Nader, is this year’s Allen I. White Lecturer. He will discuss problems with the health-care system and pharmaceutical industry at 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 18, in Spokane.Wolfe is also an adjunct professor of internal medicine at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and a member of the American Federation for Clinical Research and the Society for General Internal Medicine. The health research group, founded in November, 1971, has led to: • the banning of phenformin, Oraflex, Tandearil and Suprofen • requiring aspirin products … » More …

Design students contribute to Easter Seals initiative
September 19, 2002

Guest speakers from Kentucky, Colorado and California will address the link between health and design with Washington State University Spokane Interdisciplinary Design students and area architects on Friday, Sept. 20.In conjunction with the Northwest Architecture for Health Panel and the Easter Seals Society, WSU Spokane will host the seminar on Multigenerational Wellness Design. This is “an all too often overlooked critical relationship,” according to Keith Diaz Moore, assistant professor of architecture and landscape architecture. Diaz Moore is a nationally certified architect with expertise in the design and performance of gerontological and other life-care environments.Diaz Moore built this semester’s studio class on the Easter Seals national … » More …

Project HOPE encourages students in health science
August 23, 2002

For summer interns exploring health-care professions under Project HOPE (Health Occupations Preparatory Experience) hospital patients suddenly became more than patients — they became people who needed a positive outcome. And that’s when the interns started to understand why people choose the health care/caregiver profession, says project coordinator Bettie Rundlett.Project HOPE, a program of the Area Health Education Center (AHEC) at Washington State University Spokane, is an annual summer internship offered to high school students across Washington state. This year, some 27 health-care facilities in 11 Eastern Washington communities — Chelan, Chewelah, Manson, Moses Lake, Othello, Pasco, Prosser, Spokane, Sunnyside, Tonasket and Yakima — hosted 20 … » More …

At-risk students vaccinated
August 23, 2002

More than 1,340 fall semester students have been vaccinated in the past several weeks as part of a new annual campaign to prevent or limit future outbreaks of meningitis at Washington State University. The information and vaccination campaign, launched early this summer by WSU’s Health and Wellness Services, hopes to attract as many as 4,000 participants, said Dr. Bruce Wright, director of Health and Wellness Services.This effort was precipitated last spring when three WSU students came down with the disease in approximately two months. Due to the alertness and quick response of medical staff at Pullman Memorial Hospital and Health and Wellness Services, the students … » More …

‘Gut reaction’ emphasis of mosquito research
May 10, 2002

“Mosquitoes are by far the world’s most medically significant insects.”So says David Moffett, a professor in the School of Biological Sciences, who, with his wife Stacia Moffett, an associate professor, has been studying structure and functions of the mosquito stomach tract for the past four years. The species, Aedes aegypti, a yellow fever carrier, is under particular scrutiny, and David leads the research.World-recognized problemThe abstract from Moffett’s research project proposal states, “They (mosquitoes) are potential vectors for approximately 100 arboviruses that cause human disease, including yellow fever, dengue and a number of forms of encephalitis. They also transmit nematodes that cause elephantiasis, and plasmodia that … » More …