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Feb. 21: Noel Schulz to discuss women in STEM

By Emma Epperly, Undergraduate Education

PULLMAN, Wash. – Trends for women in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields will be discussed by Noel Schulz, Washington State University first lady and engineering professor, at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 21, in CUE 203 as a free, public common reading lecture.

Increasing the number of women in STEM has been a focus for four decades, but challenges remain for recruitment, retention and advancement. The talk will address these challenges, as well as successes and national and international trends.

Schulz, an electrical engineering professor at the WSU Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture, earned her Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities and has gathered experience in STEM at several universities over the past 25 years. She has won engineering awards and has been active in recruiting women to the field. She teaches, conducts research and is a frequent guest speaker at events for faculty, staff and students.

The lecture expands upon this year’s common reading book, “I Am Malala,” to consider equity in access to education in specific fields of study. The common reading program is intended to engage the WSU community in academically centered critical thinking, communication, research and learning around a body of shared information presented in a single, specially selected book. For more information, see https://CommonReading.wsu.edu/.

 

News media contacts:
Karen Weathermon, WSU common reading, 509-335-5488, kweathermon@wsu.edu
Emma Epperly, WSU Undergraduate Education, 509-335-9458, emmaepperly@wsu.edu

 

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