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WSU student takes second place in international competition

By Zahra Debbek, Voiland College of Engineering & Architecture
Piston Mug-2

PULLMAN, Wash- Omar Ruiz, a senior in the Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture studying mechanical engineering, placed second for a piston coffee mug he developed for the Mastercam Wildest Parts Competition.

The annual contest challenges students from around the world to design and produce high-quality parts that haven’t been made before.

Omar Ruiz
Omar Ruiz

Under the supervision of instructor Robert “Kurt” Hutchinson, Ruiz first designed and 3D-printed a model to help him visualize the coffee mug. He then used the manufacturing software Mastercam and a computer numeric control milling machine to create a new program that cut the mug out of an aluminum piston and rod.

Ruiz was awarded $500 cash and $40,000 worth of Mastercam software.

Mastercam is keeping the coffee mug for a year to showcase it at conferences and other events.

 

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