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Professor, food engineering innovator named ASABE fellow

Juming-Tang-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Juming Tang, a food engineer and professor at Washington State University, has been named a fellow of the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, an award granted to just 2 percent of members worldwide.

The highest honor awarded by ASABE (http://www.asabe.org/), it is reserved for engineers with 20 years’s membership in ASABE and outstanding qualifications and experience in agricultural engineering.

Tang is the distinguished chair of food engineering and associate chair of biological systems engineering at WSU, where he has taught and conducted research for 19 years. A pioneer in food engineering, he has led development of two novel technologies commonly referred to as “microwave-assisted thermal sterilization” or MATS (http://www.microwaveheating.wsu.edu/) and “microwave-assisted pasteurization system” or MAPS (http://microwavepasteurization.wsu.edu/).

He is a fellow of the International Microwave Power Institute. He was recipient of the 2012 International Food Engineering Award from the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers and Nestle for breakthrough microwave/radio frequency thermal processing technologies and outstanding leadership and education of food engineering professionals.

He leads a multi-institutional team investigating engineered solutions to ensure microbial safety of frozen and refrigerated meals in retail markets. His work will be transformative to the global food system, said Ralph Cavalieri, associate vice president of alternative energy at WSU and an ASABE fellow.

“Dr. Tang’s receipt of the status of fellow of ASABE is a well-earned recognition of his career of exemplary engineering research and service to the profession,” he said.

“ASABE fellows are highly accomplished individuals who have devoted themselves to making outstanding contributions to the society and the profession,” said Tang. “I feel honored and humbled to be a new member of the class.”

He and 12 other researchers will be awarded their titles at the ASABE meeting July 15 in Montreal, Canada.

 

Contacts:

Juming Tang, WSU biological systems engineering and food engineering, 509-335-2140, jtang@wsu.edu

Kate Wilhite, WSU CAHNRS communications, 509-335-8164, kate.wilhite@wsu.edu

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