Skip to main content Skip to navigation
WSU News Molecular Biology

WSU flu outbreak provides rare study material

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

h1n1PULLMAN, Wash. – Five years ago this month, one of the first U.S. outbreaks of the H1N1 virus swept through the Washington State University campus, striking some 2,000 people. A WSU math and biology professor has used a trove of data gathered at the time to gain insight into how only a few infected people could launch the virus’s rapid spread across the university community. » More …

WSU researchers find crucial step in DNA repair

By Becky Phillips, University Communications DNA-80

PULLMAN, Wash. – Scientists at Washington State University have identified a crucial step in DNA repair that could lead to targeted gene therapy for hereditary diseases such as “children of the moon” and a common form of colon cancer. » More …

Disinfectant causes reproductive problems in mice

HuntPULLMAN, Wash. – Mice exposed to disinfectants in commercial-grade cleaning products took longer to get pregnant, had fewer pups and suffered more miscarriages and distressed fetuses, according to a new study coauthored by Pat Hunt, a geneticist at Washington State University. » More …

Pesticide linked to three generations of disease

By Becky Phillips, University Communications

SkinnerPULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers say ancestral exposures to the pesticide methoxychlor may lead to adult onset kidney disease, ovarian disease and obesity in future generations. » More …

Leading hypothesis ruled out for miscarriage, birth defects

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Rowsey-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University reproductive biologists have ruled out one of the leading thoughts on why older women have an increased risk of miscarriages and children with birth defects. » More …

NIH grants WSU $2.2 million for biotech training through 2019

Black
Black

PULLMAN, Wash. – Molecular biologist Margaret Black and her colleagues in Washington State University’s NIH Biotechnology Training Program have been awarded $2.2 million over the next five years to continue training graduate students in biotechnology.

» More …

Anthropologist discovers clues to first Americans

Kemp-150PULLMAN, Wash. – For more than a decade, Washington State University molecular anthropologist Brian Kemp has teased out the ancient DNA of goose and salmon bones from Alaska, human remains from North and South America and human coprolites—ancient poop—from Oregon and the American Southwest. » More …