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Novel gene resists toxic wheat disease that costs billions
November 2, 2016

PULLMAN, Wash. – Scientists at Washington State University and Kansas State University have isolated and cloned a gene that provides resistance to Fusarium head blight, or wheat scab, a crippling disease that caused $7.6 billion in losses in U.S. wheat fields between 1993 and 2001.

Want fries with that? Stealth potato virus threatens industry
July 13, 2016

By Sylvia Kantor, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – The next time you sink your teeth into a hot, crispy french fry, consider the threats that stand between you and this iconic food. Newly emerged viruses threaten the U.S. potato industry, including potatoes grown in Washington.

Study clears way for new approaches to plant disease
June 6, 2016

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Knoblauch-webPULLMAN, Wash. – A Washington State University biologist has found what he calls “very strong support” for an 86-year-old hypothesis about how nutrients move through plants. His two-decade analysis of the phenomenon has resulted in a suite of techniques that can ultimately be used to fight plant diseases and make crops more efficient.

Study compares wines from diseased and healthy vines
May 9, 2016

By Scott Weybright, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

PROSSER, Wash. – Grapevine leafroll disease (GLD) has plagued vineyards for centuries, but little is known about how this virus impacts the fruit quality and actual wine produced from grapes of affected plants.