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Rock Doc column: How ‘bout them apples?
November 18, 2014

By E. Kirsten Peters, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

peters-e-k-2010-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Do you have a good gut feeling about apples? Your body may – and that could be important to your overall health.

Rock Doc column: The start of a better trend for diabetes
October 28, 2014

By E. Kirsten Peters, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

peters-e-k-2010-80PULLMAN, Wash. – “Eat right and exercise.” It’s good advice. But millions of Americans struggle every day to live up to our hopes regarding diet and activity.

Nature’s pooper scoopers: Can dung beetles aid food safety?
September 30, 2014

By Sylvia Kantor, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

beetle-80PULLMAN, Wash. – For farmers, especially organic farmers, who are increasingly challenged by food safety guidelines, dung beetles could provide an elegant solution to a vexing problem. Entomologists at Washington State University are investigating whether the insects could suppress harmful foodborne pathogens in the soil before they spread to humans.

An apple a day could keep obesity away
September 29, 2014

By Sylvia Kantor, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

Noratto-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Scientists at Washington State University have concluded that nondigestible compounds in apples – specifically, Granny Smith apples – may help prevent disorders associated with obesity. The study, thought to be the first to assess these compounds in apple cultivars grown in the Pacific Northwest, appears in October’s print edition of the journal Food Chemistry.

Researchers argue for better bread ingredient labeling
September 24, 2014

breadMOUNT VERNON, Wash. – In the interest of nutrition, health and taste, the time is right to clean up bread, write Washington State University researchers in the Healthy Living section of the Huffington Post on Sept. 23.

Rock Doc: A light fast twice per week
July 29, 2014

By E. Kirsten Peters, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

petersPULLMAN, Wash. – It certainly sounded like a fad to me. A while ago I caught a program on public television about a medical doctor in Great Britain. Dr. Michael Mosley, like millions in both that country and in the U.S., found that in middle age he needed to lose weight and lower his blood sugar and cholesterol levels.

Rock Doc column: Have a cup of joe to help your eyes?
July 22, 2014

By E. Kirsten Peters, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

petersPULLMAN, Wash. – My day starts with coffee. I’m too cheap to buy it by the cup from baristas, so I just brew my own Folgers by the pot. I have a cup or two as I settle into work each morning and another cup – sometimes two – in the early afternoon. That may not be wise for a chronic insomniac like myself, but it’s a lifelong habit that at this point would be quite tough to break. 

Rock Doc: Designing healthier snack foods with new wheat
July 1, 2014

By E. Kirsten Peters, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

peters-e-k-2010-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Most of us don’t spend a lot of time cooking from scratch. What’s known as processed foods – everything from snacks to boxed dinners – makes up a great deal of what most Americans eat. Indeed, the majority of what most of us eat is processed to one degree or another.

Ancient baby boom holds a lesson in over-population
June 30, 2014

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Koehler-80PULLMAN, Wash.—Washington State University researchers have sketched out one of the greatest baby booms in North American history, a centuries-long “growth blip” among southwestern Native Americans between 500 and 1300 A.D.