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WSU News Biology

Sept. 24: Law, ethics of environmental poisons debated

pollution-160PULLMAN, Wash. – Ethics, law and policy regulation of environmental toxicants will be discussed by a panel at 4 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 24, in 305 Bryan Hall, sponsored by the Foley Institute for Public Policy & Public Service at Washington State University. » More …

$1.45M grant: Preserving genome stability to fight disease

By Judith Van Dongen, WSU Spokane Office of Research

ChaiSPOKANE, Wash. – Molecular biologist Weihang Chai, an associate professor of medical sciences, has received a five-year $1.45 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to study the potential role of the CST protein complex in preserving genome stability. » More …

Wheat gene discovery clears way for non-GMO breeding

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Gill-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have found “the most famous wheat gene,” a reproductive traffic cop of sorts that can be used to transfer valuable genes from other plants to wheat. » More …

Rock Doc column: A wolf in other clothing

By E. Kirsten Peters, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

peters-e-k-2010-80PULLMAN, Wash. – I was hospitalized for 10 days in late July. In August, to rebuild my strength, I took my dog on increasingly long walks around town. We went virtually every day; the exercise was good for both Buster Brown and me. » More …

Biologist climbs high to prove hypothesis about plant phloem

knoblauch-80PETERSHAM, Mass. — Michael Knoblauch, a plant cell biologist at Washington State University, is in the stretch run of a 20-year quest to prove a longstanding hypothesis that what drives the flow of nutrients in phloem is pressure differential. » More …

WSU geneticist helps solve mystery of Arctic peoples

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

omar cornejoPULLMAN, Wash. – With help from a Washington State University population geneticist, Danish researchers have concluded that North America and the Arctic were settled in at least three pulses of migration from Siberia. First came the ancestors of today’s Native Americans, then Paleo-Eskimos – the first to settle in the Arctic – followed by the ancestors of today’s Inuit. » More …

Research finds female descendants susceptible to stress

ratsPULLMAN, Wash. – A new study by researchers from the University of Texas at Austin and Washington State University shows that male and female rats are affected differently by ancestral exposure to a common fungicide, vinclozolin. Female rats whose great-grandparents were exposed become much more vulnerable to stress. » More …

WSU flu outbreak provides rare study material

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

h1n1PULLMAN, Wash. – Five years ago this month, one of the first U.S. outbreaks of the H1N1 virus swept through the Washington State University campus, striking some 2,000 people. A WSU math and biology professor has used a trove of data gathered at the time to gain insight into how only a few infected people could launch the virus’s rapid spread across the university community. » More …

WSU researchers find crucial step in DNA repair

By Becky Phillips, University Communications DNA-80

PULLMAN, Wash. – Scientists at Washington State University have identified a crucial step in DNA repair that could lead to targeted gene therapy for hereditary diseases such as “children of the moon” and a common form of colon cancer. » More …

Disinfectant causes reproductive problems in mice

HuntPULLMAN, Wash. – Mice exposed to disinfectants in commercial-grade cleaning products took longer to get pregnant, had fewer pups and suffered more miscarriages and distressed fetuses, according to a new study coauthored by Pat Hunt, a geneticist at Washington State University. » More …