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Nov. 30: Turning Hanford radioactive waste into glass focus of DOE presentation

By Maegan Murray, WSU Tri-Cities

DOE logoRICHLAND, Wash. – A federal project director from the U.S. Department of Energy will discuss how the Hanford waste treatment plant will immobilize radioactive waste by turning it into glass as part of a continuing lecture series from 3-4 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 30, in the Washington State University Tri-Cities East Auditorium.

The presentation will be led by Jason Young, federal project director at the Office of River Protection’s analytical laboratory and balance of facilities office. The presentation is the fifth in a series of lectures focusing on the Hanford Site and is cohosted by WSU Tri-Cities and the U.S. Department of Energy. The public is invited to attend.

During his presentation, Young also will describe how the “direct feed low activity waste” approach at the Hanford Site will enable treatment as soon as 2022. Additionally, he will outline the cooperative efforts needed to support their operations.

Young joined the Office of River Protection in 2008. He previously worked for the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard as a shift test engineer in the nuclear engineering division and later served as the reactor plant technical expert for the radiological emergency planning division.

Young holds a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Lander University and a master’s degree in chemical engineering from Montana State University.

 

Contacts:

  • Tish Christman, WSU Tri-Cities administrative assistant, 509-372-7683, christman@wsu.edu
  • Maegan Murray, WSU Tri-Cities public relations specialist, 509-372-7333, murray@wsu.edu

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