WSU Cougar Head Logo Washington State University
WSU Insider
News and Information for Faculty, Staff, and the WSU Community

Students take top awards in construction management

PULLMAN, Wash. – Two Washington State University student teams placed second and one claimed third in the recent Associated Schools of Construction competition, the largest construction management contest in the U.S.

More than 1,300 students from 45 universities and 16 states participated in Reno, Nev. The competition requires that students solve complex problems in less than 24 hours, present proposals and participate in a rigorous question and answer session in a business-like setting. WSU construction management and architecture students participated.

Design-build team. At top, virtual design and construction team.

A WSU team placed second in virtual design and construction, for which students developed and presented software-based solutions to real-world building problems in less than a day. Coached by professor Anne Anderson, the students included: Sam Rykken, Martin Rogstad, Casey Angeline, Riley O’Keeffe, Sam Flor and Austin Bartleson.

Another WSU team took second in design-build, for which students developed and presented a schematic design, estimate, schedule and evaluation for a project’s management. Coached by professor David Gunderson, the students included: Ryan McQuarrie, Jaime Stidhams, Joseph Chung, Nicholaus Smith, Jacob Wilcox, David Chun and alternate Daniel Bennett.

Commercial team.

WSU placed third in the commercial category, for which students used construction management skills such as scheduling, estimating, site logistics, site safety and technical writing to develop a proposal for a real-life construction problem. Coached by professor Jason Peschel, the students included: Brady Swanson, Compton Gentry, Steven Bradshaw, Trevor Leger, Marcus Konopaski, Marie Landsverk and alternates Jacob Villars and Jack Sanogo.

“Having three teams from WSU place is historic,” said Peschel. “We continue to be impressed with the amount of work they put into preparing for this event.

“We are also fortunate at WSU to have tremendous industry support in the form of financial gifts but also in time and talent,” he said. “This support is a critical piece in both helping our students succeed in these competitions and in gaining valuable skills that they will bring to the workplace.”

 

Next Story

Bee center filling up, honey extractor moves in

Honey will soon be made at WSU’s Honey Bee & Pollinator Research, Extension, and Education Facility in Othello after a large equipment move.

Recent News

Bee center filling up, honey extractor moves in

Honey will soon be made at WSU’s Honey Bee & Pollinator Research, Extension, and Education Facility in Othello after a large equipment move.

Tribal connection inspires efforts to save salmon

Studying toxic runoff to help save iconic salmon species, Stephanie Blair draws on science as well as the knowledge and connections of her Native American community.

Insider will return Nov. 29

WSU Insider is taking a break to join with the rest of the university community in celebrating the Thanksgiving holiday. We’ll be back the morning of Nov. 29 with fresh posts for the WSU community.

Scouting for a forgotten few

WSU historian Ryan Booth sheds light on the largely forgotten history of the Northern Cheyenne and White Mountain Apache who served as scouts for the U.S. Army from 1866–1947.

Find More News

Subscribe for more updates