WSU Cougar Head Logo Washington State University
WSU Insider
News and Information for Faculty, Staff, and the WSU Community

Sept. 7: How racial change will affect election, country

David-DomkeSEATTLE – “Tectonic social change” means that the November U.S. presidential election will “define this nation for generations,” according to author David Domke. He will be the featured speaker at a sold-out annual lunch Sept. 7 for the William D. Ruckelshaus Center.

Jointly run by Washington State University Extension and the University of Washington, the center is a neutral resource for collaborative problem-solving in the state and Pacific Northwest.

“The United States is in a time of tectonic social change, comparable in transformation and turmoil to some of the most defining eras in the nation’s history,” Domke said in advance notes.

“At the heart of this moment are shifting racial patterns in America’s electorate,” he said. “The impact and implications are omnipresent, from the rise of the Tea Party on the political right to #blacklivesmatter and campus student activism on the left. In November, we will make a presidential choice that will define this nation for generations.”

Domke is chair of the UW Department of Communication.

The center is named for Ruckelshaus, who was head of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 1970 and 1983-85. He was director of the FBI and U.S. attorney general. He was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Obama in November 2015.

 

Next Story

Forest debris could shelter huckleberry from climate change

WSU scientists are at work in Northwest forests, studying how fallen logs and other woodland debris could shelter the huckleberry from a hotter, drier future.

Recent News

Forest debris could shelter huckleberry from climate change

WSU scientists are at work in Northwest forests, studying how fallen logs and other woodland debris could shelter the huckleberry from a hotter, drier future.

WSU helps dog recover from lung condition

It is still a mystery as to what caused abscesses to engulf the lungs of Ashley Hayes’ dog, Blaze, but he is now back in good health thanks to the care he received at WSU.

WSU ‘Q fever’ research earns $3 million in funding

Q fever naturally infects goats, sheep, and cattle. If transmitted to humans, the infection can lead to diverse clinical outcomes including flu-like symptoms, miscarriage or stillbirth in pregnant women.

UREC training helps Cougs rescue injured Grand Canyon hiker

The hiker looked like she might be taking a break from the strenuous ascent from the bottom of the Grand Canyon, but it was clear she was in trouble when WSU students Alana Duvall and Johannah Ludwig reached her.

Find More News

Subscribe for more updates