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Meier receives recognition for inspiring curiosity

By Lori Maricle, College of Pharmacy

MeierSPOKANE, Wash. – INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine announced today that Washington State University’s Kathryn Meier is one of 65 scientists from across the country to receive the 2016 Inspiring Women in STEM Award. She is featured in the September issue.

She was selected for work and achievement that encourage others and inspire a new generation of young women to consider careers in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math).

KayMeier-portrait-byLori-J-Maricle
Kay Meier by Lori Maricle.

She is associate dean for graduate education at the WSU College of Pharmacy in Spokane. The Ph.D. in pharmaceutical sciences program provides graduate training in cancer biology, drug discovery and translational pharmacology.

“Kay is an eloquent and passionate advocate for graduate education and an outstanding role model for the younger colleagues who will follow in our footsteps,” said Gary Pollack, dean of the College of Pharmacy.

A leader in research and academia, Meier has received international acclaim for her recent work on omega-3 fatty acids. She was featured as part of the WSU “Inspiring” series (https://wsu.edu/125/curiosity/).

Meier and the College of Pharmacy are committed to WSU’s land-grant mission to expand access to education and advance opportunity and equity to women and underrepresented groups in graduate and professional education.

 

 

 

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