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Jayaram named a fellow of mechanical engineering society

jayaram-sankar-2012-80pPULLMAN, Wash. – Sankar (Jay) Jayaram, a professor in the School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, recently was named a 2013 fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) for his expertise and contributions to virtual assembly simulations for engineering, 3-D technologies and CAD interoperability.

He joined the school in 1993 and is director of the virtual reality and computer integrated manufacturing lab that he established at Washington State University. He is co-founder of three companies: 3D-4U Solutions, Integrated Engineering Solutions and Translation Technologies.

In August, the Sports Business Journal named Jayaram one of the 15 top “Idea Innovators” for his work with 3D-4U Solutions.

He received a Ph.D. from Virginia Tech in mechanical engineering. He started the first virtual environment systems track in the society’s DETC Conference, a premier conference for mechanical engineers in academics and industry. He served as the first associate editor in virtual environments for the society’s Journal of Computing and Information Science in Engineering.

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