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Cougars guarding Bohler removed for repair

 
 
Photos by Robert Hubner, WSU Photo Services and (those with dates) by Richard Kizer, Capital Planning and Development
 
 
PULLMAN – The familiar majestic cougars guarding the west entrance to Bohler Gymnasium were lowered from their perch on a cornice above the entry this morning so contractors could restore them to original condition.

Reconditioning of the cougars is part of a larger exterior restoration of the brick and stone work at Bohler Gymnasium. It project involves:

  • replacing the flashing underneath the cougars
  • replacing all loose bricks and mortar
  • removing all the capstones from on top of the walls
  • repairing the cornice stones
  • replace all copper flashing on the building that has been staining the stonework
  • repairing the stone lintels above the windows where the stone has settled
  • cleaning and sealing of all the brick and stone
  • roofing repairs to resolve current leaks
Overseeing the project is Richard Kizer, senior architect with WSU Capital Planning and Development. The contractor on the project is D&R Masonry Restoration from Milwaukie, Ore. Work on the project started on June 1 and expected to be complete by Oct 1.
 
 

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