WSU News https://news.wsu.edu   Mon, 30 Mar 2015 22:51:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1.1 WSU Energy Summit Tackles Critical Smart Grid Challenges https://news.wsu.edu/2015/03/30/wsu-energy-summit-tackles-critical-smart-grid-challenges/ https://news.wsu.edu/2015/03/30/wsu-energy-summit-tackles-critical-smart-grid-challenges/#comments Mon, 30 Mar 2015 20:00:21 +0000 https://news.wsu.edu/?p=137000 PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University will host its inaugural energy summit on April 2 with a focus on storage technologies, one of the most critical challenges of incorporating renewable energy into the electric power grid. Washington Governor Jay Inslee, Senator Maria Cantwell, Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, as well as Imre Gyuk, Energy Storage Program … Continue reading WSU Energy Summit Tackles Critical Smart Grid Challenges

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PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University will host its inaugural energy summit on April 2 with a focus on storage technologies, one of the most critical challenges of incorporating renewable energy into the electric power grid.

Washington Governor Jay Inslee, Senator Maria Cantwell, Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, as well as Imre Gyuk, Energy Storage Program Manager, and Pat Hoffman, Assistant Secretary for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, will be among those speaking at the daylong summit, which will be held in the Lewis Alumni Centre.

The event, hosted by WSU’s Energy Systems Innovation Center, will also feature tours of WSU’s smart grid testing laboratories. WSU will also join in celebrating the dedication of Avista’s Energy Storage Project, a new battery storage system that will be tested in a real-world setting at Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories.

“We’re pleased to be able to foster these important discussions around the critical challenge of energy storage,’’ said WSU President Elson S. Floyd. “WSU has long worked on research for building a more resilient, robust, and smarter electric power grid, and being able to store solar or wind energy remains one of the key pieces to building a sustainable, carbon-free power grid of the future and a stronger economy for the state.”

WSU has a long history of leadership and a top-ranked program in electric power grid research, with researchers working to develop and incorporate new technologies aimed at improving the efficiency and reliability of electric power systems. WSU participated in a Department of Energy-funded smart grid demonstration project that made Pullman one of just a few smart grid cities in the U.S. and receives workforce development support to train graduates for the smarter power grid of the future.

Last year, Washington State University researchers received support to build the most comprehensive “smart city” laboratory in the U.S. to test smart grid technologies, complete with simulated windmills, solar panels, fuel cells, power substations and smart meters. WSU also has had a unique power research niche because of its close ties and interdisciplinary work with computer science faculty on electric grid communications.

“This is a critical time in the development and incorporation of smart grid and renewable technologies into the power grid, and it’s exciting to bring together the key players in the state and country for this summit,’’ said Chen-Ching Liu, director of the Energy Systems Innovation Center. “The large-scale deployment of these new technologies provides a tremendous opportunity to improve energy efficiency, sustainability, and reliability of the power grid.’’

The Energy Systems Innovation Center is a collaborative research center at WSU focused on research, development, and technology transfer for a smart electric power grid. The center includes ten core faculty members conducting research in the electric power grid as well as 20 faculty members in a variety of fields, including computer science, environmental sciences, economics, and sociology. Faculty teams work on interdisciplinary research and education projects funded by industry and government.

Contact:

Chen-Ching Liu, Director, Energy Systems Innovation Center, (509) 335-1150, liu@eecs.wsu.edu

Tina Hilding, communications coordinator, Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture, (509) 335-5095, thilding@wsu.edu

 

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CBS News correspondent to receive Murrow award April 2 https://news.wsu.edu/2015/03/30/cbs-news-correspondent-to-receive-murrow-award-april-2/ https://news.wsu.edu/2015/03/30/cbs-news-correspondent-to-receive-murrow-award-april-2/#comments Mon, 30 Mar 2015 18:55:58 +0000 https://news.wsu.edu/?p=136992 PULLMAN, Wash. – CBS News Correspondent Clarissa Ward has confirmed she will be on the Washington State University Pullman campus April 2nd to receive the 2015 Distinguished Achievement in Journalism Award from The Edward R. Murrow College of Communication at Washington State University. Ward is considered among the most intrepid and recognized international journalists of … Continue reading CBS News correspondent to receive Murrow award April 2

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ward-mugPULLMAN, Wash. – CBS News Correspondent Clarissa Ward has confirmed she will be on the Washington State University Pullman campus April 2nd to receive the 2015 Distinguished Achievement in Journalism Award from The Edward R. Murrow College of Communication at Washington State University.

Ward is considered among the most intrepid and recognized international journalists of our time. She has reported from every major news hotspot in the past decade and has earned numerous honors for her work from inside the civil war in Syria, as well as the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. She has also covered the Russian incursion into Georgia and the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan

In October 2014, Ward returned to Syria undercover to interview two Western jihadis – a young American man and a former Dutch soldier – about their paths to radicalism. She was the first journalist to sit down with an American fighter inside Syria.

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CBS News Correspondent Clarissa Ward

Prior to joining CBS News, Ward was an ABC News correspondent based in Beijing and Moscow and a correspondent for FOX News Channel, working out of Beirut and Baghdad. Ward graduated from Yale University with distinction and speaks six languages.

Ward is in Pullman as part of The Murrow Symposium, held annually to honor Edward R. Murrow, a 1930 WSU graduate considered one of the 20th century’s most highly regarded broadcast journalists; an industry leader, radio and television pioneer whose lofty standards and unflinching spirit of inquiry, courage and integrity continue to inspire generations of communication professionals. She will speak during the Symposium Award Ceremony at 4pm, April 2nd in Goertzen Hall.

For more information: http://murrowsymposium.wsu.edu

Media contacts:

John Paxson, Director of the Murrow Symposium, john.paxson3@wsu.ed

Darin Watkins, Murrow College Director of Communications, darin.watkins@wsu.edu (509) 335-4456

 

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“Exploding Head Syndrome” more common in young people than thought nearly one in five startled by loud, non-existent noises https://news.wsu.edu/2015/03/30/wsu-researchers-find-exploding-head-syndrome-more-common-in-young-people-than-thought/ https://news.wsu.edu/2015/03/30/wsu-researchers-find-exploding-head-syndrome-more-common-in-young-people-than-thought/#comments Mon, 30 Mar 2015 16:30:32 +0000 https://news.wsu.edu/?p=136974 By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer PULLMAN, Wash.—Washington State University researchers have found that an unexpectedly high percentage of young people experience “exploding head syndrome,” a psychological phenomenon in which they are awakened by abrupt loud noises, even the sensation of an explosion in their head. Brian Sharpless, a Washington State University assistant professor and … Continue reading “Exploding Head Syndrome” more common in young people than thought nearly one in five startled by loud, non-existent noises

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By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

PULLMAN, Wash.—Washington State University researchers have found that an unexpectedly high percentage of young people experience “exploding head syndrome,” a psychological phenomenon in which they are awakened by abrupt loud noises, even the sensation of an explosion in their head.

Brian Sharpless, a Washington State University assistant professor and director of the university psychology clinic, found that nearly one in five—18 percent—of college students interviewed said they had experienced it at least once. It was so bad for some that it significantly impacted their lives, he said.

“Unfortunately for this minority of individuals, no well-articulated or empirically supported treatments are available, and very few clinicians or researchers assess for it,” he said.

The study also found that more than one-third of those who had exploding head syndrome also experienced isolated sleep paralysis, a frightening experience in which one cannot move or speak when waking up.  People with this condition will literally dream with their eyes wide open.

The study is the largest of its kind, with 211 undergraduate students interviewed by psychologists or graduate students trained in recognizing the symptoms of exploding head syndrome and isolated sleep paralysis. The results appear online in the Journal of Sleep Research.

Based on smaller, less rigorous studies, some researchers have hypothesized that exploding head syndrome is a rare condition found mostly in people older than 50.

“I didn’t believe the clinical lore that it would only occur in people in their 50s,” said Sharpless. “That didn’t make a lot of biological sense to me.”

He started to think exploding head syndrome was more widespread last year when he reviewed the scientific literature on the disorder for the journal Sleep Medicine Reviews. In that report he concluded the disorder was a largely overlooked phenomenon that warranted a deeper look.

The disorder tends to come as one is falling asleep. Researchers suspect it stems from problems with the brain shutting down. When the brain goes to sleep, it’s like a computer shutting down, with motor, auditory and visual neurons turning off in stages. But instead of shutting down properly, the auditory neurons are thought to fire all at once, Sharpless said.

“That’s why you get these crazy-loud noises that you can’t explain, and they’re not actual noises in your environment,” he said.

The same part of the brain, the brainstem’s reticular formation, appears to be involved in isolated sleep paralysis as well, which could account for why some people experience both maladies, he said.

They can be extremely frightening.

Exploding head syndrome can last just a few seconds but can lead some people to believe that they’re having a seizure or a subarachnoid hemorrhage (bleeding in the brain), said Sharpless.

“Some people have worked these scary experiences into conspiracy theories and mistakenly believe the episodes are caused by some sort of directed-energy weapon,” he said.

In fact, both exploding head syndrome and isolated sleep paralysis have been misinterpreted as unnatural events. The waking dreams of sleep paralysis can make for convincing hallucinations, which might account for why some people in the Middle Ages would be convinced they saw demons or witches.

“In 21st century America, you have aliens,” said Sharpless. “For this scary noise you hear at night when there’s nothing going on in your environment, well, it might be the government messing with you.”

Some people are so put off by the experience that they don’t even tell their spouse, he said.

“They may think they’re going crazy and they don’t know that a good chunk of the population has had the exact same thing,” he said.

Neither disorder has a well-established treatment yet, though researchers have tried different drugs that may be promising, said Sharpless, co-author of the upcoming book, “Sleep Paralysis: Historical, Psychological, and Medical Perspectives.”

“One of the drugs they gave for exploding head syndrome actually didn’t make the noises go away,” he said. “It just turned the volume down.”

But many people are at least relieved to get a diagnosis and learn that they aren’t alone.

“There’s the possibility that just being able to recognize it and not be afraid of it can make it better,” Sharpless said.

 

Contact:

Brian Sharpless, Washington State University assistant professor of psychology, brian.sharpless@wsu.edu

Eric Sorensen, Washington State University science writer, (509) 335-4846, eric.sorensen@wsu.edu

 

 

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Wax poetic during National Poetry Month at WSU Libraries https://news.wsu.edu/2015/03/30/wax-poetic-during-national-poetry-month-at-wsu-libraries/ https://news.wsu.edu/2015/03/30/wax-poetic-during-national-poetry-month-at-wsu-libraries/#comments Mon, 30 Mar 2015 15:00:16 +0000 https://news.wsu.edu/?p=136950 By Nella Letizia, WSU Libraries PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University Libraries will sponsor three weeklong activities to ramp up poetry mojo during April, which is National Poetry Month. “We want to celebrate poetry as literature and art and also inspire students to interact with poetry and our libraries in a fun, creative way,” said … Continue reading Wax poetic during National Poetry Month at WSU Libraries

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By Nella Letizia, WSU Libraries

National-Poetry-Month-LogoPULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University Libraries will sponsor three weeklong activities to ramp up poetry mojo during April, which is National Poetry Month.

“We want to celebrate poetry as literature and art and also inspire students to interact with poetry and our libraries in a fun, creative way,” said Holly Luetkenhaus, WSU Libraries instruction librarian.

Activities, to be set up in Terrell Library’s New Books Room, include:

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Spine poem by Holly Luetkenhaus, WSU Libraries instruction librarian.

• April 6-10: “Poem in Your Pocket.” Visitors can pick up poems to take home or share with others. Social sciences librarian Lorena O’English suggests: taking two poems – one for your pocket and one for a friend; posting a poem on Twitter (#pocketpoem); writing or photocopying a poem and leaving copies anonymously all over campus; and leaving a copy of your favorite poem in the dullest book you can find as a treat for the next reader.

• April 13-17: “Dada Poetry.” The Dada or Dadaist poem sprang from the European avant-garde art movement of the early 20th century, embracing all things nonsensical, experimental and surreal. Kits will be available for people to create their own Dada poems and post them on a display board. Email (wsulibrariespullman@gmail.com) or tweet (@WSULibraries) Dada poems to Luetkenhaus or O’English, and they will print and display them.

• April 20-24: “Spine Poetry.” Spine poems are photographs of poems created from book titles on the spines of a small pile of books. Luetkenhaus and O’English encourage visitors to hunt for titles in the library book stacks, build a poem, take a photo and send it to them by email or Twitter.

Displays of all poems will stay up in Terrell through the month. For more information and ways to celebrate National Poetry Month, visit http://www.poets.org/national-poetry-month/30-ways-celebrate-national-poetry-month.

 

Contacts:
Holly Luetkenhaus, WSU Libraries, 509-335-4667, holly.luetkenhaus@wsu.edu
Lorena O’English, WSU Libraries, 509-335-2695, oenglish@wsu.edu
Nella Letizia, WSU Libraries public relations/communication coordinator, 509-335-6744, letizia@wsu.edu

 

 

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March 30: Talk on state authority, African-American liberty https://news.wsu.edu/2015/03/27/march-30-talk-on-state-authority-african-american-liberty/ https://news.wsu.edu/2015/03/27/march-30-talk-on-state-authority-african-american-liberty/#comments Fri, 27 Mar 2015 22:03:53 +0000 https://news.wsu.edu/?p=136964 PULLMAN, Wash. – A free, public lecture and teaching workshop aim to add a missing historical perspective to debates about liberty, oppression and the African-American experience of state authority. Reginald Wilburn, associate professor of English at the University of New Hampshire, will focus on how African-Americans have engaged and re-appropriated arguments for liberty and independence … Continue reading March 30: Talk on state authority, African-American liberty

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WilburnPULLMAN, Wash. – A free, public lecture and teaching workshop aim to add a missing historical perspective to debates about liberty, oppression and the African-American experience of state authority.

Reginald Wilburn, associate professor of English at the University of New Hampshire, will focus on how African-Americans have engaged and re-appropriated arguments for liberty and independence first put forward by John Milton. He was one of England’s greatest epic poets and a considerable influence on Thomas Jefferson and other leaders of the American Revolution.

Wilburn will speak at 5 p.m. Monday, March 30, in Todd 276. His pedagogy workshop will be at 10:35 a.m. Tuesday, March 31, in the PE Building 136.

He is the guest of the WSU Department of English Visiting Scholars Series.

 

 

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March 30: Undergraduate research showcase sets record https://news.wsu.edu/2015/03/27/march-30-undergrad-research-showcase-sets-participation-record/ https://news.wsu.edu/2015/03/27/march-30-undergrad-research-showcase-sets-participation-record/#comments Fri, 27 Mar 2015 19:47:07 +0000 https://news.wsu.edu/?p=136943 By Beverly Makhani, Office of Undergraduate Education PULLMAN, Wash. – Undergraduates will present posters and compete for awards at 3:30 p.m. Monday, March 30, in the CUB ballroom at the 2015 Showcase for Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities (SURCA), part of the annual Showcase celebration of Washington State University achievement. With 186 freshmen through seniors, … Continue reading March 30: Undergraduate research showcase sets record

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By Beverly Makhani, Office of Undergraduate Education

SURCA-logoPULLMAN, Wash. – Undergraduates will present posters and compete for awards at 3:30 p.m. Monday, March 30, in the CUB ballroom at the 2015 Showcase for Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities (SURCA), part of the annual Showcase celebration of Washington State University achievement.

With 186 freshmen through seniors, “this is the largest number of participants in SURCA’s four-year history,” said Shelley Pressley, director of the hosting Office of Undergraduate Research. of Undergraduate Education. “This tells us that SURCA is gaining recognition as a quality event.

“It may also speak to the fact that WSU is engaging more students across all disciplines in the high-impact experience of mentored research, scholarship and creative activity that we term ‘research,’” she said.

Evidence of the breadth of investigations is reflected in this year’s 167 posters. They range, for example, from stormwater treatment to a noninvasive blood glucose monitor, from rural summer robotics camps to sequencing the RNA of the tropical gar. An abstract book describing all presentations, and more information, can be found on the SURCA website (http://SURCA.wsu.edu).

 

 

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WSU turns 125 years old, shares cake on Pullman campus https://news.wsu.edu/2015/03/27/wsu-turns-125-years-old-shares-cake-on-pullman-campus/ https://news.wsu.edu/2015/03/27/wsu-turns-125-years-old-shares-cake-on-pullman-campus/#comments Fri, 27 Mar 2015 19:30:08 +0000 https://news.wsu.edu/?p=136916 PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University takes the cake as it celebrated 125 years as an institution Friday. Celebrating a day early due to the weekend, the Student Alumni Ambassadors helped honor WSU by distributing free slices of intricately decorated cakes made by staff at the Compton Union Building. Twenty sheets of white, carrot, chocolate … Continue reading WSU turns 125 years old, shares cake on Pullman campus

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Photos by Shelly Hanks, WSU Photo Services cake cheer

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University takes the cake as it celebrated 125 years as an institution Friday.

Celebrating a day early due to the weekend, the Student Alumni Ambassadors helped honor WSU by distributing free slices of intricately decorated cakes made by staff at the Compton Union Building.

Celebrating WSU's BirthdayTwenty sheets of white, carrot, chocolate lentil and lemon garbanzo bean cake detailed with crimson and gray flowers, frosting and sprinkles were enjoyed by Cougs passing by on the Glenn Terrell Mall.

Here are some fun facts about WSU:

▪ WSU was signed into state law on March 28, 1890

▪ Classes began in January 1892

▪ WSU was created as a direct result of the federal Morrill Act, signed into law by President Abraham Lincoln

▪ The first official colors were pink and blue ▪ Seven men and women were in the first graduating class (1897)

▪ The signature building at WSU Pullman is named for Enoch Bryan (president 1893-1915)

▪ WSU’s first name was Washington Agricultural College and School of Science

▪ The first sports moniker was the Farmers

To learn more about WSU’s mission serving the state of Washington and the world during the last 125 years, visit http://www.wsu.edu/125.

Photos by Shelly Hanks, WSU Photo Services

 

Contact:

Ashley Vu, WSU Student Alumni Association, 408-318-8497

Matt Haugen, University Communications, 509-335-0487, mhaugen@wsu.edu

phone love camera

 

 

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WSU Regents approve new student-supported technology fee https://news.wsu.edu/2015/03/27/wsu-regents-approve-new-student-supported-technology-fee/ https://news.wsu.edu/2015/03/27/wsu-regents-approve-new-student-supported-technology-fee/#comments Fri, 27 Mar 2015 17:08:39 +0000 https://news.wsu.edu/?p=136931 RICHLAND, Wash. – The Washington State University Board of Regents this morning approved a student-led proposal to charge a $20 per semester technology fee for undergraduates on the Pullman campus beginning this fall. WSU is the only four-year institution in the state that does not charge a technology fee. Student government leaders initiated the fee … Continue reading WSU Regents approve new student-supported technology fee

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RICHLAND, Wash. – The Washington State University Board of Regents this morning approved a student-led proposal to charge a $20 per semester technology fee for undergraduates on the Pullman campus beginning this fall.

WSU is the only four-year institution in the state that does not charge a technology fee. Student government leaders initiated the fee proposal based on constituent comments and formally approved it earlier this week.

Joan King, associate vice president and chief budget officer for WSU, said the fee would generate approximately $750,000 a year. She said a committee led by undergraduate students will determine how those funds will be used. Wireless printing, improving wi-fi coverage on the Pullman campus and increasing the number of smart boards in study lounges are among the top priorities outlined by students.

Board members also heard reports on a number of recent milestones and successes, including the success of the WSU medical school initiative in the Washington Legislature; a recent economic impact that outlines details of the university’s $3.4 billion in economic impact in the state in 2014; and the launching of festivities celebrating WSU’s 125th anniversary.

“The achievements of WSU over the past eight months have been absolutely extraordinary,” said Board Chair Mike Worthy.

In other business, the board:

  • Heard a future action item regarding changes to the Student Conduct Code that would allow students with a single conduct infraction on their record to have it expunged at graduation
  • Appointed King as the board treasurer

 

Contact:

Kathy Barnard, University Communications, 509-335-8055, kbarnard@wsu.edu

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Showcase: Thesis contest, faculty address celebrate WSU https://news.wsu.edu/2015/03/27/showcase-thesis-contest-faculty-address-celebrate-wsu/ https://news.wsu.edu/2015/03/27/showcase-thesis-contest-faculty-address-celebrate-wsu/#comments Fri, 27 Mar 2015 15:24:27 +0000 https://news.wsu.edu/?p=136921 PULLMAN, Wash. – Emily Johnson, a Ph.D. candidate from the College of Pharmacy, won Washington State University’s first universitywide Three Minute Thesis competition Thursday. The event, part of WSU’s annual Showcase celebration of faculty, staff and student excellence, was sponsored by the Office of the Provost. Another Showcase event, the Distinguished Faculty Address by the … Continue reading Showcase: Thesis contest, faculty address celebrate WSU

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EmilyJohnsonPULLMAN, Wash. – Emily Johnson, a Ph.D. candidate from the College of Pharmacy, won Washington State University’s first universitywide Three Minute Thesis competition Thursday.

The event, part of WSU’s annual Showcase celebration of faculty, staff and student excellence, was sponsored by the Office of the Provost. Another Showcase event, the Distinguished Faculty Address by the School of Music’s Gerald Berthiaume, also was Thursday.

Berthiaume
Music professor Gerald B. Berthiaume talks about composers and technique during his 2015 Distinguished Faculty Address, “From the Practice Room to the Stage: Do Your Research,” on Thursday. (Photo by Dean Hare, WSU Photo Services)

Johnson studies pharmaceutical sciences – specifically how anti-cancer drugs affect sugar metabolism and heart health. She hopes her research will lead to a new way of combating heart disease in diabetics.

3MT was developed by the University of Queensland (Australia) and is a competition for doctoral candidates. Contestants have three minutes to deliver their thesis to an audience, including a panel of judges.

Each of the five contestants won an event at their respective colleges in order to qualify for the universitywide event.

Johnson will receive $3,000 toward attendance at a research conference of her choice.

Second place was Robert Zinna, an entomology Ph.D. candidate from the College of Agricultural, Human and Natural Resource Sciences, who receives $1,500. Third place was Kent Godfrey, an interdisciplinary studies Ph.D. in the College of Education, who received $500.

More about the event can be found at http://3mt.wsu.edu/.

 

 

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April 9: Pollinators, sustainable agriculture presented https://news.wsu.edu/2015/03/26/april-9-pollinators-sustainable-agriculture-presented/ https://news.wsu.edu/2015/03/26/april-9-pollinators-sustainable-agriculture-presented/#comments Thu, 26 Mar 2015 21:50:25 +0000 https://news.wsu.edu/?p=136910 PULLMAN, Wash. – “A bee’s eye perspective on sustainable agriculture” will be presented by the co-director of the Berkeley Food Institute in a free, public lecture at 6 p.m. Thursday, April 9, in CUE 203 at Washington State University. A reception will begin at 5 p.m. in CUE 518. The talk by Claire Kremen is … Continue reading April 9: Pollinators, sustainable agriculture presented

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beePULLMAN, Wash. – “A bee’s eye perspective on sustainable agriculture” will be presented by the co-director of the Berkeley Food Institute in a free, public lecture at 6 p.m. Thursday, April 9, in CUE 203 at Washington State University. A reception will begin at 5 p.m. in CUE 518.

The talk by Claire Kremen is the annual E. Paul Catts Public Lecture in entomology (http://entomology.wsu.edu/events/e-paul-catts/) at WSU.

Kremen, an authority on pollinators and particularly bees, will discuss how conservation of “pollinator-friendly” habitat across landscapes can mitigate ecological harm and contribute to sustainable farming and global food security.

Kremen is professor in environmental science, policy and management at the University of California, Berkeley, and director of the food institute’s Center for Diversified Farming Systems.

The lecture honors Paul Catts who was revered as an excellent teacher, public speaker and artist. The lectureship was endowed in 2001; major contributors included Ann B. Catts, Elizabeth Beers, Frank Peryea and John and Ruth Brown.

 

Contact:
David Crowder, WSU entomology, 509-335-7965, dcrowder@wsu.edu

 

 

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