WSU News https://news.wsu.edu   Tue, 22 Apr 2014 22:25:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9 April 25: Students test prosthetic arm designs https://news.wsu.edu/2014/04/22/april-25-students-test-prosthetic-arm-designs/ https://news.wsu.edu/2014/04/22/april-25-students-test-prosthetic-arm-designs/#comments Tue, 22 Apr 2014 22:25:05 +0000 https://news.wsu.edu/?p=127583 By Melissa O’Neil Perdue, WSU Tri-Cities RICHLAND, Wash. – Teenagers are taking up the challenge of making prosthetic arms work better and feel more comfortable. Middle and high school students will put their prosthetic arm designs to the test at MESA Day on Friday, April 25, at Washington State University Tri-Cities. The Mathematics, Engineering, Science […]

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MESA Day 2013By Melissa O’Neil Perdue, WSU Tri-Cities

RICHLAND, Wash. – Teenagers are taking up the challenge of making prosthetic arms work better and feel more comfortable.

Middle and high school students will put their prosthetic arm designs to the test at MESA Day on Friday, April 25, at Washington State University Tri-Cities. The Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement program (MESA) of Yakima Valley/Tri-Cities has invited 240 students from the Pasco, Granger and Sunnyside school districts.

About 55 teams will participate in the competition 8:30 a.m.-1 p.m. in the Consolidated Information Center, 2770 Crimson Way, Richland.

MESA-Day-2-2013-500Using a kit of basic materials, teams must research, design, build and test a prosthetic arm that mimics the movements of a wrist, hand and fingers. Performance will be judged on:

◾Distance accuracy relay: greatest distance and accuracy achieved when tossing balls of three different sizes into target containers located at three different distances.

◾Object relocation: greatest mass-to-time ratio achieved when placing objects of varying weight into the specified container.

◾Dexterity: greatest number of bolts and nuts correctly placed and secured onto the testing device.

Students will be judged in four areas: device performance, a technical paper, academic display and oral presentation. As they rotate through MESA Day activities, they also will compete in a creative banner challenge.

The event’s keynote speaker is Paul Kelley, engineering support lead for the low-activity waste facility, balance of facilities and analytical laboratory for Bechtel National, Inc. at the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant in Richland.

The competition is put on with support from community partners. Bechtel is the lead sponsor, joined by Battelle, HAPO Community Credit Union, URS and Washington River Protection Solutions.

“Bechtel has a long history of supporting the MESA program,” said Bechtel’s Peggy McCullough, project director for the waste treatment plant project. “This gift is an investment in the next generation of students who will lead the country in the areas of science, technology, engineering and math.”

The highest scoring high school and middle school teams will win Kindle Fires donated by URS plus a ticket to the May 16 state competition in Redmond, Wash.

MESA provides enriching educational opportunities that help build a pathway to college and careers in the science, technology, engineering and math fields for students who are underrepresented in those fields: African-American, Latino, Native American and female. The Yakima Valley/Tri-Cities division of MESA is based at WSU Tri-Cities. Learn more at http://tricity.wsu.edu/mesa.

Learn about WSU Tri-Cities and its commitment to dynamic student engagement, dynamic research experiences and dynamic community engagement at http://tricity.wsu.edu.

 

Contacts:

Soo Park, MESA, WSU Tri-Cities, 509-372-7385, soohyun.park@tricity.wsu.edu

Melissa O’Neil Perdue, Marketing and Communications Manager, WSU Tri-Cities, 509-372-7319, cell/text 509-727-3094, moneil@tricity.wsu.edu

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Crowds prompt Ferdinand’s to open this Saturday https://news.wsu.edu/2014/04/22/crowds-prompt-ferdinands-to-open-this-saturday/ https://news.wsu.edu/2014/04/22/crowds-prompt-ferdinands-to-open-this-saturday/#comments Tue, 22 Apr 2014 18:09:35 +0000 https://news.wsu.edu/?p=127570 PULLMAN, Wash. — There’s good news for anyone craving Ferdinand’s ice cream this weekend. The Washington State University creamery’s ice cream shop will be open 1-4 p.m. Saturday, April 26. Who can we thank for this rare Saturday opening? The more than 12,000 visitors expected on campus this weekend to participate in WSU Admissions’ “Preview […]

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Ferdinand's-80PULLMAN, Wash. — There’s good news for anyone craving Ferdinand’s ice cream this weekend. The Washington State University creamery’s ice cream shop will be open 1-4 p.m. Saturday, April 26.

Who can we thank for this rare Saturday opening? The more than 12,000 visitors expected on campus this weekend to participate in WSU Admissions’ “Preview for Juniors” and the Student Entertainment Board’s “Springfest 2014.”

Ferdinand's-600“We had a lot of families asking us if Ferdinand’s would be open,” said Jocelyn De Jong, director of recruitment for WSU Enrollment and Recruitment. “So we thought we would investigate the option.”

Ferdinand’s is typically only open on weekends of home football games, Mom’s Weekend and for graduation.

“The School of Food Science saw this as an opportunity to reach more students and let them know about Ferdinand’s and the school,” said Russ Salvadalena, creamery manager.

Ferdinand’s is located at 2035 NE Ferdinand’s Lane in the Food Quality Building, two blocks east of the new Biotech/Life Sciences Building. It is south of the Indoor Practice Facility.

 

Contact:
Kate Wilhite, WSU CAHNRS communications, 509-335-8164, kate.wilhite@wsu.edu

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April 23: Book night promotes reading with giveaway https://news.wsu.edu/2014/04/22/april-23-book-night-promotes-reading-with-giveaway/ https://news.wsu.edu/2014/04/22/april-23-book-night-promotes-reading-with-giveaway/#comments Tue, 22 Apr 2014 17:48:19 +0000 https://news.wsu.edu/?p=127563 By Nella Letizia, WSU Libraries PULLMAN, Wash. – Get a free book at the Washington State University Libraries on Wednesday, April 23, and be part of an international event to promote reading. The giveaway is part of World Book Night 2014. During the daylong event, 25,000 volunteers from across the United States each will give […]

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book night logoBy Nella Letizia, WSU Libraries

PULLMAN, Wash. – Get a free book at the Washington State University Libraries on Wednesday, April 23, and be part of an international event to promote reading.

The giveaway is part of World Book Night 2014. During the daylong event, 25,000 volunteers from across the United States each will give away 20 copies of a specially printed book they have read and loved, chosen from a list of 35 titles selected by a panel of librarians and booksellers.

An anticipated half million free paperbacks will be handed out, some to people who may never have owned a book.

Twenty copies of “Miss Darcy Falls in Love” by Sharon Lathan will be available starting at 4 p.m. in the WSU Terrell atrium while supplies last. The book is the sixth in Lathan’s “Darcy Saga” series and follows the life and loves of Georgiana Darcy, the younger sister of Fitzwilliam Darcy (Jane Austen’s “Pride and Prejudice”). Lathan started publishing her sequels to Austen’s classic in 2009.

“My hope is that we encourage people down the road to a love of reading with this event,” said Kay Vyhnanek, the local World Book Night organizer.

In 2013, the first year WSU Libraries participated in World Book Night, several librarians gave away their favorite reads to strangers. Christy Zlatos handed out copies of Lisa Scottoline’s 2009 missing-child thriller “Look Again” at Pullman Regional Hospital.

“Although the process went pretty well and the recipients loved the books, I ended up wishing I had more books to give out and also a wider range of books, such as graphic novels for teenage boys and something in Vietnamese for a woman who didn’t speak English,” Zlatos said. “World Book Night is a fun thing to do and very worthwhile, too.”

Librarians Vyhnanek, Marilyn Von Seggern and Lorena O’English centered their efforts on WSU students in the CUB. They distributed “My Antonia,” Willa Cather’s 1918 pioneering classic, and “Moneyball,” Michael Lewis’s 2003 nonfiction account of the Oakland Athletics baseball team.

“Not every student is interested in reading, but those who did stop were generally enthusiastic about receiving a free book,” Von Seggern said. “You can tell the real readers by the gleam in their eye as they anticipate a good story, a book they haven’t read yet, and they walk away examining the cover closely.”

“It was harder than I thought to give my books away,” O’English said. “I think people just found it unexpected. I hope that more awareness of World Book Night will help with this in the future. I appreciate all the publishers who work with this program to provide such wonderful free books.”

For more about World Book Night, visit http://www.us.worldbooknight.org.
Contacts:
Kay Vyhnanek, WSU Libraries scholarly communications librarian, 509-335-9514, kayv@wsu.edu
Christy Zlatos, WSU Libraries education librarian, 509-335-4536, zlatos@wsu.edu
Marilyn Von Seggern, WSU Libraries government information librarian, 509-335-8859, m_vonseggern@wsu.edu
Lorena O’English, WSU Libraries social sciences librarian, 509-335-2695, oenglish@wsu.edu
Nella Letizia, WSU Libraries public relations/communication coordinator, 509-335-6744, letizia@wsu.edu

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Golf tournament a fun way to fund student scholarships https://news.wsu.edu/2014/04/22/golf-tournament-a-fun-way-to-fund-student-scholarships/ https://news.wsu.edu/2014/04/22/golf-tournament-a-fun-way-to-fund-student-scholarships/#comments Tue, 22 Apr 2014 17:25:13 +0000 https://news.wsu.edu/?p=127558 PULLMAN, Wash. – The Palouse Ridge Golf Club will host the sixth annual Jess Ford of Pullman Hardhat Classic Golf Tournament Saturday, Aug. 2, to benefit Washington State University’s Facilities Services Scholarship Fund. Check-in begins at 7 a.m. with a shotgun start at 8 a.m. Each participant will pay a $135 fee that includes 18 […]

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golf-pickup-200PULLMAN, Wash. – The Palouse Ridge Golf Club will host the sixth annual Jess Ford of Pullman Hardhat Classic Golf Tournament Saturday, Aug. 2, to benefit Washington State University’s Facilities Services Scholarship Fund. Check-in begins at 7 a.m. with a shotgun start at 8 a.m.

Each participant will pay a $135 fee that includes 18 holes, golf cart rental, hat, hat clip with two tournament ball markers, small bucket of practice balls and barbecue lunch provided by Banyan’s, the golf club restaurant.

golf-tournament-logo-600Hole-in-one prizes include a new 2014 Ford F150 STX 4X4 pickup; see http://www.hardhatclassic
.com/
.

To register, go to http://www.hardhatclassic.com/application.htm.

A portion of each participation fee goes toward the Facilities Services Scholarship Fund and may be added to the endowment principal. For more information on how the tournament contributes to the fund, please see http://www.hardhatclassic.com/scholarship.htm.

Those interested in sponsorship opportunities – from $50 to $1,000 – can contact Lorrie Arrasmith at 509-335-9024 or go to http://www.hardhatclassic.com/sponsors.htm.

 

Contact:
Lorrie Arrasmith, WSU Facilities Services, 509-335-9024, lorriea@wsu.edu

 

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Today: ‘Being Wrong’ about Shakespeare, the humanities https://news.wsu.edu/2014/04/22/today-being-wrong-about-shakespeare-the-humanities/ https://news.wsu.edu/2014/04/22/today-being-wrong-about-shakespeare-the-humanities/#comments Tue, 22 Apr 2014 17:12:41 +0000 https://news.wsu.edu/?p=127555 PULLMAN, Wash. – The question of who really wrote Shakespeare’s masterpieces and how that affects our understanding of creativity will be discussed in a free, public, common reading presentation at 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 22, in Todd 130. Events across the university through the year were based around the common reading book, “Being Wrong,” by […]

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Delahoyde-80PULLMAN, Wash. – The question of who really wrote Shakespeare’s masterpieces and how that affects our understanding of creativity will be discussed in a free, public, common reading presentation at 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 22, in Todd 130.

Comm-read-Being-wrong-cover-80Events across the university through the year were based around the common reading book, “Being Wrong,” by Kathryn Schulz.

“Traditionally, we may have been wrong all along about ‘Shake-speare,’ ” said Michael Delahoyde, Washington State University English clinical associate professor. “Coming to an understanding of the implications of our having been mistaken about the Bard is crucial for our understanding of the humanities – and of humanity.

“What is creativity? Where does it come from?” Delahoyde said. “Beyond the Shakespeare authorship controversy, how we approach the enigma and answer the question concerning who wrote the works, right or wrong, determines how we construct our paradigms of creativity – not just in the arts but throughout our own lives and in our endeavors as human beings.”

Delahoyde has taught at WSU since 1992 and is part of the Teaching Academy. His website lists his expertises as heretical Shakespeare, Chaucer, popular culture, vegetarian cooking, monster films, the TV soap opera “All My Children,” apostrophes and housework, among others. He earned BA degrees in English and music at Vassar College, and an MA and Ph.D. in English at the University of Michigan.

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Rock Doc: FDA considers changes to nutrition labels https://news.wsu.edu/2014/04/22/rock-doc-fda-considers-changes-to-nutrition-labels/ https://news.wsu.edu/2014/04/22/rock-doc-fda-considers-changes-to-nutrition-labels/#comments Tue, 22 Apr 2014 16:43:03 +0000 https://news.wsu.edu/?p=127553 By E. Kirsten Peters, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences PULLMAN, Wash. – While I have been dinking around for months trying to lose five pounds, two of my friends have gotten serious about weight loss. Each of them is down 50 pounds. I’m pleased for them, of course, and truly impressed by […]

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By E. Kirsten Peters, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

PetersPULLMAN, Wash. – While I have been dinking around for months trying to lose five pounds, two of my friends have gotten serious about weight loss. Each of them is down 50 pounds.

I’m pleased for them, of course, and truly impressed by their accomplishments. Successfully combating overweight and obesity is one of the best things people can do for their health. It can help everything from joint pain to heart function, from Type 2 diabetes to certain aspects of mental health.

But it’s not always easy to know what we should eat. How many calories are in a slice of pizza or a baked potato? Is it better to reach for an apple or a banana as a snack – or does it make any difference?

The Food and Drug Administration is the branch of the federal government that oversees the labeling of packaged foods. A great deal of processed food is eaten in the U.S., so labels are one key to trying to improve public health.

Recently the FDA opened a public comment period on proposed changes to what’s called the Nutrition Facts Label. The label, introduced 20 years ago, is up for a full makeover. Here’s an overview of what’s likely to change:

- Larger, bold lines will tell you the calories in a serving and the servings per container. This information is on the old labels, but it will jump out at you on the proposed new labels. The idea is that we should be clearly told which foods pack a lot of calories.

- Serving sizes will be modified in keeping with what people really eat and drink these days. A 20-ounce bottle of soda pop, for example, which is often drunk by an individual all in one go, would be labeled as one serving and the calorie count for it declared clearly on the label.

- The new labels will tell you about “added sugars.” Many nutritionists recommend we eat fewer calories from added sugars. Some food is naturally sweet, of course, but adding sugars to foods can needlessly increase their calorie content.

- The proposed label changes include information about vitamin D and potassium. These have been declared “nutrients of public health significance.” Iron and calcium contents will continue to be required; vitamins A and C will be optional.

- “Calories from fat” will be dropped in favor of just the breakdown on where the fat is coming from (saturated fat and trans fat). The reason is that many researchers believe the type of fat you eat is more important than the total amount.

Some of the changes should make it easier to understand whether you really want to eat those crackers or not. Maybe that will help me make better choices that will help me shed my unwanted five pounds.

Dr. E. Kirsten Peters, a native of the rural Northwest, was trained as a geologist at Princeton and Harvard. This column is a service of the College of Agricultural, Human and Natural Resource Sciences at Washington State University.

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International team sequences rainbow trout genome https://news.wsu.edu/2014/04/22/international-team-sequences-rainbow-trout-genome/ https://news.wsu.edu/2014/04/22/international-team-sequences-rainbow-trout-genome/#comments Tue, 22 Apr 2014 15:46:51 +0000 https://news.wsu.edu/?p=127539 By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer PULLMAN, Wash. – Using fish bred at Washington State University, an international team of researchers has mapped the genetic profile of the rainbow trout, a versatile salmonid whose relatively recent genetic history opens a window into how vertebrates evolve. The 30-person team, led by Yann Guiguen of the French […]

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By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

thorgaard-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Using fish bred at Washington State University, an international team of researchers has mapped the genetic profile of the rainbow trout, a versatile salmonid whose relatively recent genetic history opens a window into how vertebrates evolve.

The 30-person team, led by Yann Guiguen of the French National Institute for Agricultural Research, reports its findings this week in Nature Communications.

Recent doubling enables study

The investigators focused on the rate at which genes have evolved since a rare genome doubling event occurred in the rainbow trout approximately 100 million years ago. Unlike most evolutionary processes involving mutations and the selection of advantageous traits, a doubling event acts like the copied draft of a piece of writing that can be edited and recast without the risk of destroying the earlier version.

Ordinarily, the consequences of such doubling events are lost to science as they get cast out by selective forces in subsequent generations. But because 100 million years is a relatively short time, evolutionarily speaking, the trout researchers could in effect glimpse the fish’s evolutionary editing process.

“In humans and most vertebrates the duplication events were older so there are fewer duplicated genes still present,” said Gary Thorgaard, a co-author and WSU biologist with four decades of experience peering into the trout’s genes. “Most of the duplicated genes get lost or modified so much that they are no longer recognizable as duplicates over time.  In the trout and salmon we can see an earlier stage in the process and many duplicated genes are still present. “

A versatile fish

The rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, is one of life’s great success stories. It has straddled the worlds of nature and nurture, naturally thriving in a range of temperatures and water quality while responding to domestication so well that it has been spread by human hand from the Pacific Rim to thrive in waters on six continents.

In Washington, state hatchery crews have stocked more than 16 million fish in lakes. The lowland-lake trout-fishing season opener, which takes place this year on April 26, draws some 300,000 people, making it the state’s most popular outdoor sporting event.

Clones provide consistency

Thorgaard, the only American on the largely French research team, provided genetic material from the Swanson line of rainbow trout. Originally from Alaska’s Kenai Peninsula, the fish has been cloned at WSU, ensuring that researchers are looking at the same fish in successive studies and simplifying interpretation of its sequenced genes.

“Several studies had previously been done on the Swanson clonal line,” said Thorgaard, “which helped in producing and interpreting the genome sequence in this study.”

WSU research associate Joe Brunelli extracted DNA from fin tissue, using fish managed with several other lines by Paul Wheeler in the Pullman campus’s indoor fish hatchery.

Evolution rate varies

Guiguen and his colleagues used both the genome sequence and gene expression data from the rainbow trout to show that roughly half of all protein coding genes have been deleted since its genetic doubling event. It has retained almost all its microRNA genes, which help regulate gene expression.

The researchers also found the fish retained original or nearly original genes involved in embryonic development and development of connections between nerve cells. The timing associated with these changes suggests gene evolution after an event such as this is a much slower process than previously thought.

“It seems that the rate of evolution can vary in different situations,” said Thorgaard. “Some animals, like the lungfish and coelacanth, are ‘living fossils’ that have been around for hundreds of millions of years without changing very much. Others, like the polar bear, seem to have evolved quite recently. After the trout gene duplication, the process happened more slowly than it has in most other vertebrate animals, and we can still watch it going on.”

For more information, see “The rainbow trout genome provides novel insights into evolution after whole-genome duplication in vertebrates,” Nature Communications, http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2014/140422/ncomms4657/full/ncomms4657.html

 

Contact:
Gary Thorgaard, WSU professor of biological sciences, 509-335-7438, gary.thorgaard@wsu.edu

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WSU innovation improves drowsy driver detection https://news.wsu.edu/2014/04/22/wsu-innovation-improves-drowsy-driver-detection/ https://news.wsu.edu/2014/04/22/wsu-innovation-improves-drowsy-driver-detection/#comments Tue, 22 Apr 2014 15:00:55 +0000 https://news.wsu.edu/?p=127533 By Judith Van Dongen, WSU Spokane SPOKANE, Wash.—Researchers at Washington State University Spokane have developed a new way to detect when drivers are about to nod off behind the wheel. Their recently patented technology is based on steering wheel movements—which are more variable in drowsy drivers—and offers an affordable and more reliable alternative to currently […]

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By Judith Van Dongen, WSU Spokane

drowsydrivingSPOKANE, Wash.—Researchers at Washington State University Spokane have developed a new way to detect when drivers are about to nod off behind the wheel.

Their recently patented technology is based on steering wheel movements—which are more variable in drowsy drivers—and offers an affordable and more reliable alternative to currently available video-based driver drowsiness detection systems.

Van Dongen“Video-based systems that use cameras to detect when a car is drifting out of its lane are cumbersome and expensive,” said Hans Van Dongen, research professor at the WSU Sleep and Performance Research Center. “They don’t work well on snow-covered or curvy roads, in darkness or when lane markers are faded or missing.

“Our invention provides an inexpensive and user-friendly technology that overcomes these limitations and can help catch fatigue earlier, well before accidents are likely to happen,” said Van Dongen, who developed the technology with postdoctoral research fellow Pia Forsman.

The science behind the invention was published in the journal Accident Analysis & Prevention. Researchers analyzed data from two laboratory experiments conducted at WSU Spokane.

Twenty-nine participants were on a simulated 10-day night shift schedule that caused moderate levels of fatigue, as assessed by their performance on a widely used alertness test known as the psychomotor vigilance task (PVT). During each night shift, participants spent four 30-minute sessions on a high-fidelity driving simulator, which captured data for 87 different metrics related to speed, acceleration, steering, lane position and other factors.

Data analysis indicated that the two factors that best predicted fatigue were variability in steering wheel movements and variability in lane position.
Researchers then showed that data on steering wheel variability can be used to predict variability in lane position early on, making it possible to detect driver drowsiness before the car drifts out of its lane.

“We wanted to find out whether there may be a better technique for measuring driver drowsiness before fatigue levels are critical and a crash is imminent,” Van Dongen said. “Our invention provides a solid basis for the development of an early detection system for moderate driver drowsiness. It could also be combined with existing systems to extend their functionality in detecting severe driver drowsiness.”

The solution uses inexpensive, easy-to-install parts—including a sensor that measures the position of the steering wheel—and could be included as part of a factory installation or as an aftermarket accessory.

A patent for this method of measuring driver drowsiness has been assigned to WSU under patent number 8676444, with Van Dongen and Forsman as the inventors.

The paper describing their work was published in Vol. 50 of Accident Analysis & Prevention with Forsman—now with the University of Helsinki in Finland—as the lead author. Coauthors include Van Dongen; WSU researchers Bryan Vila and Robert Short; and Christopher Mott of Pulsar Informatics, a private firm that develops behavioral alertness technology.

 

Contacts:

Hans Van Dongen, WSU Spokane Sleep and Performance Research Center, 509-358-7755, hvd@wsu.edu

Judith Van Dongen, WSU Spokane/WSU News, 509-358-7524, jcvd@wsu.edu

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WSU pilots effort to help families eat healthy on a budget https://news.wsu.edu/2014/04/21/wsu-pilots-effort-to-help-families-eat-healthy-on-a-budget/ https://news.wsu.edu/2014/04/21/wsu-pilots-effort-to-help-families-eat-healthy-on-a-budget/#comments Mon, 21 Apr 2014 20:51:41 +0000 https://news.wsu.edu/?p=127521 PULLMAN, Wash. – Studies show 16.2 million U.S. children live in households that lack the means to get nutritious food on a regular basis. Washington State University Extension 4-H has received $150,000 to engage 2,500 youth and families in 13 counties in the 4-H Food Smart Families program. Washington is one of five states selected […]

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4-H-logo-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Studies show 16.2 million U.S. children live in households that lack the means to get nutritious food on a regular basis. Washington State University Extension 4-H has received $150,000 to engage 2,500 youth and families in 13 counties in the 4-H Food Smart Families program.

Washington is one of five states selected for a pilot program by the National 4-H Council and ConAgra Foods Foundation. A ConAgra gift will fund the initiative.

During the first year, the council will evaluate the program and later replicate it to reach youth and families nationwide. It will ultimately equip families with healthy living skills and education that will translate into lasting behavior changes.

The effort will build on the Youth Advocates for Health (YA4-H!) program piloted in 2013 through WSU Extension. YA4-H! trains teens as teachers and advocates for health. They will work in partnership with adult leaders to develop county teams to teach nutrition, cooking, budgeting and active living skills to younger youth within their communities.

One in every three children is overweight or obese. And children from low-income and low-education households are three times more likely to be obese. The 4-H Food Smart Families program will help families make healthy lifestyle decisions beginning at the point of their grocery shopping experience and continuing to meal preparation in their kitchens.

According to a recent Tufts University study, researchers found that 4-H youth are more likely to have healthy eating and exercise habits. They are also three times more likely to actively contribute to their communities than that of their non-4-H peers.

Learn more about 4-H at http://www.4-H.org, on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/4-H and on Twitter at https://twitter.com/4H.

Learn more about ConAgra Foods Foundation at  http://www.conagrafoodsfoundation.org or http://www.facebook.com/ConAgraFoodsFoundation.

Contacts:
Shirley Calodich, WSU Extension health promotion, 360-385-0843, sbroughton@wsu.edu
Mary Katherine Deen, WSU Extension 4-H, 509-682-6956, deen@wsu.edu

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Employee honorees named; appreciation event May 2 https://news.wsu.edu/2014/04/21/employee-honorees-named-appreciation-event-may-2/ https://news.wsu.edu/2014/04/21/employee-honorees-named-appreciation-event-may-2/#comments Mon, 21 Apr 2014 20:18:54 +0000 https://news.wsu.edu/?p=127518 PULLMAN, Wash. – Fifteen employees will be honored at the first Faculty and Staff Appreciation Day ceremony hosted by the Associated Students of WSU Senate. The free event will be at 6 p.m. Friday, May 2, in the CUB junior ballroom. The winners are: Exceptional Professor Award: Rita Rud, Honors College Samantha Swindell, College of […]

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PULLMAN, Wash. – Fifteen employees will be honored at the first Faculty and Staff Appreciation Day ceremony hosted by the Associated Students of WSU Senate. The free event will be at 6 p.m. Friday, May 2, in the CUB junior ballroom.

The winners are:

Exceptional Professor Award:
Rita Rud, Honors College
Samantha Swindell, College of Arts and Sciences
Joni Stevens, College of Education
Martin Maquivar, College of Agricultural, Human and Natural Resource Sciences
Robert “Kurt” Hutchinson, College of Engineering and Architecture
Daniel Petek, College of Communication
Donna Paul, College of Business

Outstanding Staff Member Award:
Gayle Landeen, administrative manager, School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering
Joan Halsey, ASWSU program coordinator
Suzanne Appleyard, associate professor, College of Veterinary Medicine
Aubrie Piper, residential education director, Northside Residence Hall
Darrel Nelson, instructional lab supervisor, College of Veterinary Medicine

Best Advisor Award:
Sisouvanh Keopanapay, College of Arts and Sciences academic advisor
Marvin Marcelo, Cable 8 Productions advisor

Cougar Award:
Kate Hellman, International Student Center coordinator and assistant director

 

The post Employee honorees named; appreciation event May 2 appeared first on WSU News.

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