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WSU News Sustainability

Lab to build and test high speed, high frequency nanochips

By Alyssa Patrick, College of Engineering and Architecture

Pande-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Some of the world’s smallest and most efficient computer chips will be built and tested by professors in the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science with funding from a grant for state-of-the-art equipment. » More …

Friendship between researcher, teenager benefits honey bees

By Kate Wilhite, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

Sheridan-Miller-80PULLMAN, Wash. – At just 16 years old, Sheridan Miller is already a veteran fundraiser. The Mill Valley, Calif., teenager recently donated $1,400 she raised to help support Washington State University’s honey bee stock improvement program. Over the past six years, she has raised more than $5,000 to help fund research aimed at combating colony collapse disorder (CCD) and saving the honey bee. » More …

Researchers win national award for sustainable ag

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Plants growing with plastic mulches in a high tunnel at the WSU Mount Vernon Northwest Research and Extension Center. (Photo by Carol Miles, WSU)

MOUNT VERNON, Wash. – For the first time, tomato growers using high tunnels (low-cost greenhouses, http://mtvernon.wsu.edu/hightunnels/) in western Washington can manage one of the most serious plant diseases organically, said plant pathologist Debra Inglis. » More …

Compost: Closing the loop on urban garbage and local farms

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Commercial compost is spread at a Snohomish County farm. (Photo by Andrew Corbin, WSU)

By Sylvia Kantor, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

SNOHOMISH COUNTY, Wash. – Compost produced from urban food and yard waste could be “black gold” to farmers wanting to increase their yields and profits while improving soil and water quality. Washington State University Extension in Snohomish County is exploring how urbanization, long considered a threat to local agriculture, might actually help farmers keep up with demand for local food while recovering a valuable resource from the urban waste stream. » More …

Undergrads earn scholarships for research in alternative fuels, renewable energy

PULLMAN, Wash. – Undergraduate research in alternative fuels and renewable energy got a boost thanks to support for four Washington State University students from the DeVlieg Foundation and Weyerhaeuser Company. » More …

WSU Vancouver prof honored with Sustainability Science Award

John Harrison, WSU

Harrison

VANCOUVER, Wash. – John Harrison, associate professor in the School of the Environment at Washington State University Vancouver, was recently honored with the 2013 Sustainability Science Award by the Ecological Society of America for his work on the book “Seeds of Sustainability: Lessons from the Birthplace of the Green Revolution.”

He shares this award with 14 other contributors to the boo, including its editor, Pamela Matson.

“Seeds of Sustainability,” published in 2011, is an analysis of 15 years of data pertaining to the agricultural development and transitions toward more sustainable management of the … » More …

Research furthers food security, sovereignty

HeckelmanPhoto of Amber Heckelman by Laura Evancich, WSU Vancouver.

VANCOUVER, Wash. – Amber Heckelman, a doctoral student of environmental science at Washington State University Vancouver, has won the 2013-2014 Bullitt Foundation Environmental Fellowship worth $100,000 for research that centers on alleviating the suffering of Philippine peasants by restoring food security and sovereignty.

Awarded annually since 2007, the prize goes to an outstanding, environmentally knowledgeable graduate student from an underrepresented community who has demonstrated an exceptional capacity for leadership as well as scholarship. This is the third year in a row the honor has gone to a WSU student.

“Amber … » More …