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WSU News Sustainability

Alternative to wasteful methane flaring developed by WSU researchers

Bakken methane flareBy Eric Sorensen, WSU News

PULLMAN, Wash. – Jean-Sabin McEwen knocks out a Web search for “North Dakota,” “night sky” and “flaring,” and quickly finds a picture from space showing a glowing cluster bigger than Minneapolis. It’s from oil and gas fields burning off methane, producing as much greenhouse gas in a year as 1 million cars. » More …

Algae cultivation technique could advance biofuels

By Tina Hilding, Voiland College of Engineering

Sandra Rincon grad student algae research
Rincon

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have developed a way to grow algae more efficiently — in days instead of weeks — and make the algae more viable for several industries, including biofuels. » More …

WSU to lead $30M international partnership to advance power grid

Noel Schulz Anurag SrivastavaPULLMAN, Wash. – WSU will lead a nationwide consortium of U.S. universities and industry partners in a five-year, $30 million joint research project with India to advance the development of the power grid in both countries. » More …

Driest wheat region breaks 100-year snow record – how’s the wheat?

Samantha Crow and Brian FodeBy Linda Weiford, WSU News

LIND, Wash. – The eastern Washington town of Lind broke a record this winter for having the longest streak of snow cover since employees at Washington State University’s Dryland Research Station started keeping records 100 years ago. » More …

Researchers develop recycling for carbon fiber composites

carbon fiber composite PULLMAN, Wash. – A WSU research team for the first time has developed a promising way to recycle the popular carbon fiber plastics that are used in everything from modern airplanes and sporting goods to the wind energy industry. » More …

Hoophouses give WSU organic farm an early launch

By Scott Weybright, CAHNRS Communicationspicking spinach

PULLMAN, Wash. — When you’re a teaching farm at a university, the winter and early spring months require creativity and innovation.

“There just isn’t much for students to do in the fields in the spring semester,” said Brad Jaeckel, manager of the Washington State University’s Eggert Family Organic Farm. “So using season extenders, like our hoophouses, is really valuable for them to get some hands-on experience.” » More …

April 10: Disease control in reused wastewater

PULLMAN, Wash. – A warming world climate is expected to increase the need for successful recycling of wastewater for human use and irrigation. Controlling disease-causing viruses in this water will be discussed at 4:10 p.m. Monday, April 10, in PACCAR 202 at Washington State University. » More …