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WSU News Botany

Plant inner workings point way to more nutritious crops

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

PULLMAN, Wash. – Almost every calorie that we eat at one time went through the veins of a plant. If a plant’s circulatory system could be rejiggered to make more nutrients available – through bigger seeds or sweeter tomatoes – the world’s farmers could feed more people. » More …

Ask Dr. Universe: Why are plants green?

PUYALLUP, Wash. – A lush tropical rainforest, a field of sunflowers, a garden in your neighborhood. Our Earth is home to all kinds of plant life. From trees to catnip, there are thousands of different species of plants. Most of these plants are green, but not all of them. » More …

Researchers tackle impact of climate change on plants

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers are undertaking an industrious investigation into the effects of global warming on plants. Making the effort possible is a fully automated “plant hotel” that can analyze up to 6,000 seedlings in a single experiment. » More …

Soybean nitrogen breakthrough could help feed the world

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

mechthild-tegederPULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University biologist Mechthild Tegeder has developed a way to dramatically increase the yield and quality of soybeans. » More …

Modeling maps vegetation to monitor erosion, rising seas

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

stephen-hendersonVANCOUVER, Wash. – Washington State University scientists Stephen Henderson and Nikolay Strigul have developed a computer model that uses photographs to recreate the complex geometry of coastal plants. » More …

How does your rain garden grow? Best plants for Northwest

Puyallup-rain-gardens-web

By Linda Weiford, WSU News

PUYALLUP, Wash. – Leave it to Northwesterners to brandish garden gloves and trowels in their attack against water pollution. » More …

Study clears way for new approaches to plant disease

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Knoblauch-webPULLMAN, Wash. – A Washington State University biologist has found what he calls “very strong support” for an 86-year-old hypothesis about how nutrients move through plants. His two-decade analysis of the phenomenon has resulted in a suite of techniques that can ultimately be used to fight plant diseases and make crops more efficient. » More …