By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

jeff-vervoortPULLMAN, Wash. – Jeff Vervoort, a WSU professor of geology, has been named a fellow of the American Geophysical Union, the nation’s top professional organization in earth science, for his work to help determine the origin and evolution of the Earth and solar system.

No more than 0.1 percent of the union’s members are recognized as fellows each year.

A geochemist, Vervoort specializes in using isotopes – specific signatures of different elements – to understand how the Earth formed and evolved. Isotopes can give insights into geologic processes while helping determine the ages of rocks and geologic events.

AGU (https://eos.org/agu-news/celebrating-the-2016-class-of-fellows) singled out Vervoort’s “contributions to understanding lutetium-hafnium geochemistry and geochronology” and the application of this isotope system to help determine the origin and evolution of the Earth and solar system.

Since 1962, the union’s fellows program has recognized “scientific eminence in the Earth and space sciences” and acknowledged fellows for “remarkable contributions to their research fields, exceptional knowledge and visionary leadership.”