VANCOUVER – The WSU Vancouver Center for Social and Environmental Justice (CSEJ) released its “2010 Clark County Equity Report” today to the residents of Clark County. The report measures the level of equity in Clark County using a combination of secondary and primary data.

Clay Mosher, associate professor of sociology and a research affiliate of CSEJ, has collected descriptive data that measure numerous facets of equity throughout Clark County. Looking at measures for education, the economy, health and criminal justice, Mosher gathered data that gives a snapshot of differences among the county’s various racial, ethnic and income groups.

The data collected complement other recent efforts to measure the overall wellbeing of Clark County such as the 2009 Community Report Card from the Vancouver-based, non-profit Community Choices.

The report available to the public on CSEJ’s homepage, www.vancouver.wsu.edu/programs/csejustice/home.html
 
Future reports will serve to track changes in well-being and raise awareness among community organizations of progress being made to reduce inequities.
 

A partial list of the topics covered in the report includes the following: home ownership, income and poverty levels by race/ethnicity; dropout rates and educational attainment by race/ethnicity; variations in WASL standards for local school districts; juvenile sentencing rates by race/ethnicity and gender; and variations in adverse childhood experiences by family income.

CSEJ collaborates with WSU faculty, students and community partners to foster rigorous analysis of social, economic racial and environmental justice issues and promote human rights and conflict resolution at the local, national and global levels through: interdisciplinary community-based research, interdisciplinary curricular innovations and media projects.

Since 2002, CSEJ has worked to make WSU Vancouver a site for socially engaged research and community service. CSEJ is sponsoring its fourth regional conference March 27 (www.vancouver.wsu.edu/marcomm/health/ ) and has partnered with local universities and more than 50 community organizations to sponsor lectures and public forums on issues of concern.