PULLMAN — Lucila (Luci) Loera will become interim dean of students at WSU Pullman on Dec. 1. She is currently director of Student Support Services TRiO Program at WSU, a position she has held for five years.

Alton Jamison, acting vice president for student affairs, made the announcement Monday (Nov. 14). He said that the creation of a dean of students position is an important part of the student affairs office’s efforts to focus on meeting student needs. In her new position, Loera will oversee the offices of campus involvement, student conduct, Greek life and student support services.

“Luci’s in-depth understanding of students and her ability to establish trusting relationships with them will combine with her excellent organizational, communication and leadership skills to establish a dean of students role,” Jamison said. “I am confident that her work will very positively contribute to the quality of the student experience at Washington State University.”

Jamison said that over the next year, Loera will be working with students, faculty and staff to shape and define the position. He said a national search would be conducted to fill the position on a permanent basis.

As head of the Student Support Services program, funded by the U.S. Department of Education, Loera provided the direction and management, and evaluation of program services to ensure compliance with federal regulations. The program supports the retention of low-income and first-generation college students and those from diverse backgrounds. Prior to leading the Student Support Services program, Loera worked for five years as a career counselor at WSU Career Services’ Office.

“I am excited by this opportunity,” Loera said. “I try to lead by building coalitions and maintaining a student-centered approach. I plan to work closely with the campus community to address the important needs of our university and to be a strong advocate for our goals.”

Loera, 36, earned a master’s degree in counseling psychology from WSU and a bachelor’s degree in social ecology from the University of California, Irvine.

She has co-presented at the American Counseling Association, Washington Counseling Association and the Faculty and Staff Conference on research related to career development and multicultural counseling. She wrote a chapter on mentoring published in the “Chicana/o and Latina/o Studies for the 21st Century: New Perspectives on Mentorship and Research” and has written articles published in “Career Watch,” produced by the Commission for Career Development of the American College Personnel Association.