PULLMAN, Wash. — Dr. Stephen A. Hines, an associate professor of
veterinary microbiology and pathology in the Washington State University
College of Veterinary Medicine, has been selected as “Washington Professor
of the Year.”

Hines was chosen for the award by the 2000 Carnegie Foundation for the
Advancement of Teaching and the Council for Advancement and Support of
Education. The U.S. Professors of the Year Program recognizes the most
outstanding instructors in the nation who influence both the lives and careers
of their students. The award is recognized as one of the most prestigious that
can be bestowed on a college or university educator in this country.

“I firmly believe that awards such as this are an affirmation of our combined
efforts at WSU to be among the nation’s best veterinary medical educators,”
said Hines. “While I’m personally grateful, I’m more proud of the team of WSU
veterinary educators I’m fortunate to work alongside of each day. I hope our
students understand how lucky they are to be taught by such a dedicated
group of educators. These individuals have certainly made me a better
educator and mentor.”

“I am extremely proud of our faculty at WSU’s veterinary college,” said interim
dean Warwick Bayly. “To have a faculty member like Dr. Hines selected by the
Carnegie Foundation and CASE from the 476 peers who were nominated for
this award is a fitting recognition for Dr. Hines in particular and our entire
faculty as a whole.”

Hines was the only veterinarian selected Professor of the Year. He is
internationally known for his excellence as a veterinary medical educator. In
1997, he was awarded a Sahlin Faculty Excellence Award from WSU and the
Basic Sciences Teaching Award from the American Veterinary Medical
Association. In addition to his faculty responsibilities, Hines coordinates the
Diagnostic Challenges program — honored with the 1995 National Award for
Creativity in Teaching in veterinary medicine by the Merck Corp. Hines also
received the national Carl J. Norden Award from the Association of American
Veterinary Medical Colleges as the 1996 Teacher of the Year. In 1996, he
received WSU’s highest teaching honor, the Marian E. Smith Faculty
Achievement Award. He has been named Sophomore Teacher of the Year
three times, Jerry Newbrey Teaching Scholar twice, and was the 1996 Norden
Distinguished Teacher in the college.

Maintaining an active research program, Hines is also studying the molecular
biology and immunology of infectious disease in domestic animals. His
research has received funding from the USDA, the U.S. Agency for
International Development, and the Grayson-Jockey Club Research
Foundation.

A public reception to recognize Hines is planned for 4-5:30 p.m. Nov. 30 in the
WSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital.

cp110-00